Empire, State and Society: Britain since 1830

By Jamie L. Bronstein; Andrew T. Harris | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Both authors wish to acknowledge and express gratitude to Peter Stansky, who guided us through the pleasures of modern British historiography in graduate school. Tessa Harvey and her colleagues at Wiley-Blackwell proved adept, constructive and flexible editors. The three anonymous reviewers of the final manuscript corrected many mistakes, and we take responsibility for any that remain.

Andrew Harris thanks his students at Bridgewater State University for their curiosity and excitement about that other England new to them, for many wonderful conversations, and for the opportunity to think through some of the ideas incorporated here. His colleagues in the history department and the university offered stimulating and supportive collegiality, especially Ann Brunjes, who has been close friend, colleague, co-teacher and conscience. Howard London and Dana Mohler-Faria supported work on this project while the author undertook administrative positions in their respective offices, and Ron Pitt has been friend and mentor extraordinaire. Bob Woods first showed how historical study could be rigorous, exacting and fulfilling as a temperament as well as a discipline. Deepest gratitude goes to Ted and Gilda Harris, and to Laurie and Eli, without whose love and support such an undertaking would have been impossible.

Jamie Bronstein would like to thank colleagues and friends who made helpful suggestions or read chapters of the manuscript, including Ken Hammond, Chad Martin, Andrew Muldoon, Dawn Rafferty, and Mark Walker. She would also like to thank the students in her classes at New Mexico State University, who provided a sounding-board for many of the ideas that were incorporated into these chapters. Finally, she would like to acknowledge Mike Zigmond, who read chapters, made suggestions, and participated in many one-sided conversations about nineteenthand twentieth-century Britain, with great patience and humor; and Evan Zigmond, for being an unending source of comic relief.

-ix-

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