Diary of a Yankee Engineer: The Civil War Story of John H. Westervelt, Engineer, 1st New York Volunteer Engineer Corps

By John H. Westervelt; Anita Palladino | Go to book overview

Diary of an Engineer during the
rebellion

No. XXXII

Mar 1st 1864

-got quarrelsome and began fighting among themselves. The fight lasted for an hour and not a man but was wounded, but only slightly. Finally the provost guard made their appearance and broke up the mess. Most of them took their boat and went on board, but five of them did not seem to have enough and remained behind trying to kick up a fray with the soldiers. Just as our boys was beating retreat (sunset) a big sailor came along and with a piece of gas pipe hit one of the drums knocking it in a cocked hat. Lieut Farland tryed to take the pipe from him but the fellow showed fight and the rest coming to his assistance the melee became general, the Engs went in with a will drove them to the boat carrying those who were unable to walk, chucked them into it and shoved it from the shore thus ending a fight that had lasted near two hours, in five minutes. 29th We were mustered in today for the last two months. This circumstance reminded me that it was leap year and consequently 29 days in the month, I had forgotten it which accounts for the date heading this number. We have not been set to work yet. March 1st Went fishing to day. Genl Gilmore arrived and a general review took place of all the force here. Quite an excitement occurred here this afternoon. An attack being expected and the rebs driving some of our pickets back induced some of us to believe the rebs were advancing in force. All our fatigue parties outside the works were called in and held in readiness for a fight, but it all ended in a slight skirmish with some of the rebel scouts and this morning the 2nd all is quiet again. I went fishing again to day for the third time but have not caught anything yet. I do not despair for though few are caught the smallest weigh 5 lbs and I have seen several that weighted 15 lbs each, all catfish. This end of the track of the Jacksonville and Lake City rail

-112-

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Diary of a Yankee Engineer: The Civil War Story of John H. Westervelt, Engineer, 1st New York Volunteer Engineer Corps
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