Diary of a Yankee Engineer: The Civil War Story of John H. Westervelt, Engineer, 1st New York Volunteer Engineer Corps

By John H. Westervelt; Anita Palladino | Go to book overview

Diary of an Engineer during the
rebellion

Apl 8th 1864


No. XXXIV

Today I received my first wound in the service. In moving a blacksmiths bellows I let it fall on my foot nearly crushing my big toe. As it was it was only saved by the extraordinary thickness of my shoes. It is a lump of black and blue flesh. The nail will no doubt come off and I shall be obliged for a few days to hobble about with one foot and a stick. 13th For the last few days quite an excitement has been kept up by the removal of troops from this point. As far as I can learn all will be taken that can be spared and sent to the army of the Potomac. 14th To day a tower was completed opposite the depot. It was built by the engineers and is 110 ft. high. It has taken over six weeks to build it. Ours on Folly if I recollect right was completed in 21 days and stood 145 ft from the ground. 15th To day our forces evacuated Palatka and came down to Jacksonville. All the works (military) were destroyed and every thing brought away that was likely to be of use to the rebels. Another place this side of Pilatka the name of which I will give you here after we still hold. 16th Another steamer has been blown up by torpedos this morning as the Genl Hunter1 the fastest river steamer we have out here, was coming down from Picollati (the place above referred to) she encountered a torpedo which blew her smoke stack up in the air like a rocket. So far I have only heard of one man being killed. Although we evacuated Pilatka voluntarily yet the expedition has proved a rather unprofitable one.2

1. Gen. Hunter, a transport ship, was destroyed by mines in the same manner as the Maple Leaf two weeks earlier.

2. Palatka (also known by the Native American name of Pilakikaha, “crossing over”) was abandoned by Union troops after several fruitless skirmishes with the Confederates. Federal Writers Project, Florida: A Guide to the Southernmost State (New York: Oxford University Press, 1939), p. 353.

-121-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Diary of a Yankee Engineer: The Civil War Story of John H. Westervelt, Engineer, 1st New York Volunteer Engineer Corps
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 268

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.