Diary of a Yankee Engineer: The Civil War Story of John H. Westervelt, Engineer, 1st New York Volunteer Engineer Corps

By John H. Westervelt; Anita Palladino | Go to book overview

Diary of an Engineer During the
Rebellion

No. 48

Oct 10 I have been verry sick for the last few days and have forgotten what I wrote in my last number. I think the last date was Oct 5th. That was the day I was taken. Otis came up about 9 P.M. On the 6th we captured two milch cows and a Bullock. We tied the cows up and shot the bullock which afforded us fresh meat in plenty as long as it would save. The cows gave about 4 qts of milk each. At sundown Otis started for B.100. Our cook with a waggon went along to bring up rations, tying one of the cows behind, but after crossing the pontoon in the woods in the dark she broke loose & escaped. It was the best one of the two. Otis wanted me to get the Lieut to let him stay in my place, but I thought I could tough it out, and declined. On the 7th we moved the train a mile nearer the pontoon and near Genl Butlers HdQrs. In the afternoon I was taken worse with considerable fever. On the morning of the 8th Lieut P. started for B. 100 to be gone two days. He asked me if I wished to go, but as I felt better mornings I still thought I would stick it out. He then left me in full charge giving the boys a little advice on obeying orders, and told me to come in whenever I felt that I could stay no longer. I am thus particular in mentioning these things because he is one of the kindest hearted men in the service. At 11 A.M. my fever returned with redoubled violence completely throwing me on my back. It seemed my brain was on fire and my head would split with pain. I now concluded to return to B. 100 as soon as possible but I could not move while my fever was on. An order came in for a lot of iron work and sent a man with a team and the order to Lieut P. with a request to send some conveyance out for me. I could not ride in one of the hard waggons. Just as my fever left me, Otis and Lieut Coe came out. As I did not dare trust a return of my fever I arranged to have Otis take my place and I returned with his horse, a verry

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