Diary of a Yankee Engineer: The Civil War Story of John H. Westervelt, Engineer, 1st New York Volunteer Engineer Corps

By John H. Westervelt; Anita Palladino | Go to book overview

Diary of an Engineer During the
Rebellion

No. 56

Jan 17th Quite cold again to day with snow slowly spitting. I have returned in and taken a receipt for my gun and equipments. I think I have done with carrying a gun during this war. It always was a useless and troublesome article to me. I dont think I could count the number of rebels I have shot. I had occasion to take a ride on the other side of the river this afternoon. The new bridge is getting along finally and will be in use in a few days. This afternoon news arrived here of the capture of Fort Fisher.1 The report seems to be reliable and there is considerable rejoicing in both army & navy. All seem to think here that Butler could have taken if he choosed but that he thought the credit would be given to the navy and so backed out and left it.

18th 19th 20th Nothing unusual. The weather remains fine. It is cold and the roads are in pretty good condition. The news of the capture of Fort Fisher was confirmed on the 18th and rumors of the fall of Wilmington was in circulation. 21st This morning it rains and the earth here is covered with a complete glade of ice. The day was one continual deluge but the earth was so completely coated that the water ran off as fast as it fell. 22nd Sunday Overcast, damp an foggy. Having calculated to go to Bermuda hundred all the week I would not be disappointed so I saddled up and started. The roads were pretty hard and I was soon there. Had a general good time and returned again at 4 P.M. The little corporal came up to day. He is mustered out and goes home tomorrow. 22nd [sic] still raining, roads are awful. After dark heavy and rapid firing commenced in the vicinity of Fort Brady and Dutch Gap. Something unusual has occurred as it has been very quiet

1. The attack on Fort Fisher began on January 13th and continued to the 15th when the Confederate fort and was captured. Long, Day by Day’p.624.

-206-

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