Diary of a Yankee Engineer: The Civil War Story of John H. Westervelt, Engineer, 1st New York Volunteer Engineer Corps

By John H. Westervelt; Anita Palladino | Go to book overview

Diary of an Engineer During the
Rebellion

No. 57

February1st Warm and pleasant. Commenced to thaw in the morning & made considerable mud by night. It will take several days to thaw the frost entirely of the ground as it reached a considerable depth during the last few cold days. Yesterday afternoon large bodys of ice floated down the James completely carrying away the Pontoon bridge. The new bridge is complete except the draw. A temporary draw was made of canal boats and thus in a few hours after the accident teams were able to cross. The late cold weather has detained the mail. We have not had any for several days. It is said the mail boats are all froze fast in the Potomac. I hear a mail has arrived at City Point and will probably reach us to night. You wish to know what I have to eat, I will tell you. You must know that last summer our rations were cut down both in quantity & quality. Potatoes were cut off. Rice and hominy we were allowed only one of. Molasses was cut off entirely. Peas were cut off. Rations are issued every ten days as follows. Salt port, Beef, Codfish & mackerel, Bread & crackers, tea & coffee, salt, sugar, vinegar. Bread is issued to us five days & five crackers. We have the choice of leaving one or both behind and drawing flour. We draw our five days bread and five of flour in place of the hard tack. I again give my five days bread for five of flour, consequently I have all flour. Fish is only dealt out one kind each ten days. Potatoes can only be had by leaving some other article behind and getting the same value in that useful vegetable. Fresh beef is issued to us three days out of ten. Salt beef is very scarce and issued in small quantities. I am compelled to buy some things at the commissaries on orders. Potatoes cost per lb 1½ cts, Onions 4¼, flour 6½, molasses 80 cts per gall, I have tasted none of the above articles except the last two since Christmas. I bake my flour a number of ways

-210-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Diary of a Yankee Engineer: The Civil War Story of John H. Westervelt, Engineer, 1st New York Volunteer Engineer Corps
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 268

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.