Diary of a Yankee Engineer: The Civil War Story of John H. Westervelt, Engineer, 1st New York Volunteer Engineer Corps

By John H. Westervelt; Anita Palladino | Go to book overview

Diary of an Engineer During the
Rebellion

No. 60

Apl 3rd, 1865 I pass over the days of my furlough without remark and recommence on the day I started on my return to the army. On reaching Jersey City the ticket agent tried to beat me out of my passage on the 8 O’clock train stating that my transportation was only good for the 10 O’clock train. The latter train would not reach Baltimore in time for the boat and consequently would delay me 24 hours in reaching Fortress Monroe. I insisted my transportation was good for any train going to Baltimore and threatened to report him if he did not give me my ticket. He Anally gave me a ticket saying I would run the risk, but what risk had I to run with a bona Ade ticket in my possession. The fellow undoubtedly hoped to induce me to pay my fare rather than be delayed, a game that was much practiced on soldiers as also a hundred of a similar nature. New Jersey is the meanest state in the Union. At 8.10 we started. Before reaching Philadelphia a gentleman got in at one of the stations and informed the passengers of the fall of Petersburg & Richmond.1 Several civilian gentlemen at different times over the trip seated themselves by me and entered into conversation, all seemed highly elated and anxious to please. They insisted on buying and presenting me with apples and oranges &c. In fact they would buy from every boy that had anything to sell and then insisted on my sharing with them. I have heard men say that they have been on furloughs before that soldiers were used like dogs by civilians, but I can assure you that throughout my whole furlough I was never used with greater civility or respect. Any man (soldier) who has manly independence and self respect will insure gentlemanly treatment from all except drunken men and loaf-

1. The Confederates evacuated Richmond April 2; on April 3 both Richmond and Petersburg were occupied by union troops. Long, Day by Day, pp. 662–63.

-222-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Diary of a Yankee Engineer: The Civil War Story of John H. Westervelt, Engineer, 1st New York Volunteer Engineer Corps
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 268

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.