Diary of a Yankee Engineer: The Civil War Story of John H. Westervelt, Engineer, 1st New York Volunteer Engineer Corps

By John H. Westervelt; Anita Palladino | Go to book overview

Diary of an Engineer During the
Rebellion

No. 67

May 12th Last night brought us some of the heaviest showers I have known. The rain was accompanied by heavy thunder and lightning. This morning it is so cold that my hand are numb. Shermans army is still crossing. This is the third day with scarcely any intermission. The people of Richmond look on in mute astonishment at the vast numbers. It is a good idea to let them see the force Uncle Sam can raise if they should ever be thinking of withdrawing themselves from the family circle again. 13th It is warmer again to day, but the cold yesterday has floored me again. My cough and rheumatism have returned nearly as bad as ever. Yesterday I had a severe chill and fever, to day a very high fever. I must get home as soon as possible and have proper medical attendance or I fear for the result. Shermans army still crossing. One can hardly realize that we had so many men in the field as have passed through this city, and these are but a small portion of the whole. 14th A very fine day. Went over and saw Capt Robeson to day, also Dr McGeary. I found they had taken no steps yet towards my discharge, Both however said they would do so, and assured me it would be all right. Dr McGeary is anxious to keep the Regt in the field, but I do not think that will prevent him from helping me out. I am better again to day.—

We have news to day of the capture of Jeff Davis. The dispatch is said to be official—Genl Hall says the Regt will go out before the 1st of June, but I think not. Dr McGeary says I am better here than I would be north, but I shall not withdraw my application now. If they had let me alone I should not have made it yet. 15th & 16th The weather is very fine again and getting quite warm. Consequently I am improving, but the difficulty is that it takes 4 or 5 days to gain what I lose in as many hours by these sudden changes. If I may judge by last year I think the weather will be steady from this out.

-248-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Diary of a Yankee Engineer: The Civil War Story of John H. Westervelt, Engineer, 1st New York Volunteer Engineer Corps
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 268

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.