For a Vast Future Also: Essays from the Journal of the Abraham Lincoln Association

By Thomas F. Schwartz | Go to book overview

ABOUT THE CONTRIBUTORS

EUGENE H. BERWANGER is a professor of history at Colorado State University, Fort Collins. He is author of The Frontier Against Slavery: Western Anti-Negro Prejudice and the Slavery Extension Controversy (1967) and The West and Reconstruction (1981).

CHRISTOPHER N. BREISETH is President of Wilkes University. His other contribution to Lincoln stuthes is “Lincoln, Douglas and Springfield in the 1858 Campaign,” in Cullom Davis, et al, eds. The Public and Private Lincoln: Contemporary Perspectives (1979).

DON E. FEHRENBACHER (1920–1997) was the William Robertson Coe Professor of History and American Stuthes at Stanford University. Alldior of numerous books, he won the Pulitzer Prize in History in 1979 for The Dred Scott Case: Its Significance in American Law and Politics. His last book, co-alldiored with his wife Virginia, is Recollected Words of Abraham Lincoln (1996).

NORMAN B. FERRIS is a professor of history at Middle Tennessee State University. He is author of two books on William Henry Seward’s diplomacy: Desperate Diplomacy: William H. Seward’s Foreign Policy, 1861 (1976) and The Trent Affair: A Diplomatic Crisis (1977). He is now writing a full-lengdi biography of Seward.

JOHN HOPE FRANKLIN is the James B. Duke Professor Emeritus of History, Duke University. He is alldior of numerous books, including The Emancipation Proclamation (1963), From Slavery to Freedom: A History of Negro Americans, 7di ed. (1994), and George Washington Williams: A Biography (1985). President William J. Clinton awarded Franklin the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1995.

WILLIAM E. GIENAPP is a professor of history at Harvard University. His book The Origins of the Republican Party, 1852–1856 (1987) won

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