The European Sun: Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Scottish Language and Literature, University of Strathclyde, 1993

By Graham Caie; Roderick J. Lyall et al. | Go to book overview

Introduction

….Pause stranger at this small town’s edge—
The European sun knew these streets…

George Bruce, ‘A gateway to the sea’

If George Bruce’s fine poem describes St Andrews rather than Glasgow, and if the latter is no longer a ‘small town’, the image which provides the title for this volume nevertheless captures very well the spirit which infused the 1993 International Conference on Scottish Language and Literature (Medieval and Renaissance), the seventh of its kind, the proceedings of which are published here. Jointly organised by the Universities of Strathclyde and Glasgow, the conference had as its central focus the cultural relations between Scotland and its European neighbours, a fitting theme in a city which had recently been honoured with the title ‘European City of Culture’. If the sun did not always shine in a literal sense, an awareness of the close historical links between Scotland and the rest of Europe, including England, remained at the centre of the participants’ concerns, and the high quality of many of the papers will, the editors hope, be apparent to the reader of this volume.

Since the inception of the series at Edinburgh in 1975, these international conferences have brought together scholars from all over the world to present the results of their research and to debate key questions in the literary and linguistic history of Scotland. They have been marked by a breadth of subject matter, from Celtic Scotland to (by a liberal interpretation of their remit) the influence of Older Scots literature after the Union, and by a wide diversity of methodological approaches. Some trends are clear, and are reflected in this volume: a steady broadening of the canon, for example, is evident, and whereas the first meetings in the series placed a heavy emphasis on the best-known medieval poets, especially Henryson and Dunbar, more and more attention has been given over the years to the work of their predecessors, contemporaries and successors. This is linked to a greater recognition of the importance of the later sixteenth and earlier seventeenth centuries in the history of Scottish literature, a tendency evidenced here by a number of important papers on writers of this period.

The period during which the Medieval and Renaissance Scottish Conference has established itself as a regular triennial event has seen many important changes in the disciplines with which it is mainly concerned. The emergence of new kinds of historicist approach in literary studies, for example, has had a demonstrable effect on a field in which historicism of various kinds has always been central; and the interaction of such ways of reading with more traditional

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The European Sun: Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Scottish Language and Literature, University of Strathclyde, 1993
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 544

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.