The European Sun: Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Scottish Language and Literature, University of Strathclyde, 1993

By Graham Caie; Roderick J. Lyall et al. | Go to book overview

JOHN CORBETT


36. Teaching Older Scots… as a Foreign
Language?

What is ‘TOSFL’?

Over the past decade, I have spent much of my time as a teacher of English as a Foreign Language (EFL) to overseas students, both here in Scotland and elsewhere. My intention today is to combine two interests by considering the teaching of Older Scots from the point of view of EFL methodology – the time alloted is brief and I am aware that I can hardly do justice to both subjects. I should also state here that the activities described in this paper are largely speculative – I have introduced some Older (and Modern) Scots poetry in some classes, but not systematically. However, the activities I shall focus on are wellestablished in EFL, and I believe they could be adapted profitably to the teaching of Older Scots, both to natives of Scotland, and others, if the spirit were willing.

Why should the spirit be willing? In his introduction to Glasgow University’s excellent M. Phil Unit on Classroom Applications of Medieval and Renaissance Literature, MacGillivray writes that:

Undoubtedly, in dealing with older Scottish texts, the major stumbling block,
both for teachers and pupils, will be the nature of the language in which texts
were written. Middle Scots and, to a lesser extent, Renaissance Scots are forms
of the language that are bound to present initially severe difficulties to readers
who, all too often, claim to have problems with the varieties of Modern Scots
that they encounter.1

The Unit goes on to advise teachers on a variety of ways to reduce these difficulties for Scottish teachers and pupils (eg using local associations, annotating and illustrating texts, etc.). The activities I shall suggest might be seen as complementary to those in the M. Phil Unit; that is, they are intended to increase familiarity with and fluency in the target variety, they are not primarily intended to increase knowledge about Older Scots.

Which aspects of EFL methodology, then, might be most usefully adapted to Teaching Older Scots as a Foreign Language (hereafter TOSFL)? First of all, EFL focuses on needs. What does the learner need to do in the target variety? In the case of Older Scots, the primary purpose in learning the language is presumably to gain access to the written literature. I shall therefore concentrate

1 A. MacGillivray, M.Phil in Scottish Literature Paper 1: Medieval and Renaissance Literature 1375–1625: Unit 1F: Classroom Applications Dept of Scottish Literature, University of Glasgow, c 1988 p. 13.

-399-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The European Sun: Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Medieval and Renaissance Scottish Language and Literature, University of Strathclyde, 1993
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 544

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.