Integrating Care for Older People: New Care for Old, a Systems Approach

By Christopher Foote; Christine Stanners | Go to book overview

APPENDIX 9.2
Balanced Scorecard
The concept of a balanced scorecard to develop performance drivers was introduced in 1992 in America (Oliveira 2001). It was a method of carrying forward an organization’s strategy using a set of measures to achieve and communicate a shared view of its future development. The scorecard is an aid in creating ‘balance’ among various factors which contribute to the overall performance within an organization. The balance adopted reflects the strategic choices of the organization or project.The organization is viewed from four vital perspectives:
• financial
• internal processes
• learning and growth
• customer.

The balanced scorecard is intended to link short-term operational control to the long-term vision and strategy of the initiative. Strategy is seen as meaning the relationship between the project’s vision and the operational plans to be followed on a day-to-day basis.

It is based on three dimensions in time; yesterday today and tomorrow i.e. what we
do for tomorrow may have no noticeable financial or other benefit until the day after
tomorrow. (Olve, Roy and Wetter 1999, p.7)

In a balanced scorecard outcome measures are combined with measures that describe resources spent or activities performed. Good scorecards will combine outcome measures with performance drivers, i.e. factors which will determine or influence future outcomes.

The primary function of the scorecard is to control ‘company’ operations. It furnishes a language for describing expectations and performance, then laying a foundation for discussions on how each individual can contribute to fulfilling the company’s vision. The model should be viewed as an instrument for translating an abstract vision and strategy into specific measures and goals. Much of the strength of the model lies

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