Integrating Care for Older People: New Care for Old, a Systems Approach

By Christopher Foote; Christine Stanners | Go to book overview

APPENDIX A
EPICS - A Profile of an Elderly Persons Integrated
Care System in South Buckinghamshire
EPICS was a jointly-owned ‘virtual’ organization which brought together health and social services, local authorities and the community and, above all, the older people and their carers into an integrated system of care. It was responsible to a Project Board with all the stakeholders represented at the level of senior management, including the local housing association and voluntary organizations. It was chaired by the Chief Executive of the South Buckinghamshire NHS Trust.
EPICS aim:
• to maintain people over 65 in the community by co-ordinating flexible, responsive packages of care according to assessed needs, placing particular emphasis on speed of response to prevent inappropriate admissions to hospital, and residential or nursing home care, and to prevent problems becoming crises.

EPICS mission:
• to ensure older people and their carers are at the heart of planning and delivery of services
• to ensure that all sections of the community, providers and commissioners of service, work co-operatively to provide the best support possible for older people and their carers.

EPICS direct provision:
• easily accessible information
• a single point of access 24 hours a day
• self-referral by older people and their families
• swift contact and multidisciplinary assessment
• mobilization of support co-ordinated across a range of services

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