Integrating Care for Older People: New Care for Old, a Systems Approach

By Christopher Foote; Christine Stanners | Go to book overview

Subject Index
Abbeyfield 36
access 281
easy 85
to local shops 204
to social care systems 78
accessibility, to primary care 41
accident and disease prevention 114–17
accident and emergency units 31, 52, 56
accidental adversaries 57
accountability 281
and scrutiny, local 21
model 207–8
and team-working in complex adaptive systems 315
Action Points 193
acute hospital
distress, reduction in 122–1
problems in 326–31
alternative sites for unplanned care 330–1
problems in admission process 327–8
problems in inpatient care for older people 328–30
problems in referral process 326–7
addictive behaviour 55–6
administration 165
admission process, problems in 327–8
alternative triage and different admission sites 327
combination of capacity and demand 328
reducing demand 327
Age Concern 115, 140, 190, 196, 214, 242, 250, 368
Camden 208, 210–11
Hillingdon 207
Slough 178
ageism, dedicated leadership to combat 42–3
Agewell programme 214
aim 292
EPICS 357
alcohol use 112
AII Our Futures 206
ambulance services 141
Amersham Interational (later Nycomed) 296, 369
analysis sheet for referrers 262
Anchor Trust 36
Anderson, Fergus 28
arthritis 118
Asian community
elders 213
and pharmacy 204
assessment 15, 19
analysis and implementation of outcomes 103–4
decision-making must be planned for 104
training 104
who should do it? 103–4
comprehensive old-age assessment 95
contact assessment 95
context of process 96–9
place 96–7
time factors 97
who should be assessed? 97–8
who should do the assessment? 99
as core process 90
effective 85
ensuring sustainability of system 99–101
Ownership 100
Relevance of procss 101
toolbox approach 100
evaluation processing 184–6
in example job description for EPICS co-ordinator 163
getting to know the older person 89–108
in-depth assessment 95
involvement of older person in 91–4
and Lifeplan 78, 93–4
overview assessment 95
purpose of 94–5
reasons for undertaking 95
resource implications 102–3
information technology 102
relationship of assessment process to care management 102
sharing resources 102
time 102
screening 41
selecting assessment tool 104–6 domains and subdomains of care 106–7
stages of process 95–6
at-risk group 98
attitudes, examine personal 40
attractors 60
audits, clinical 241, 245, 267
Ayres, Cathy 369
balance 280
balance-of-care approach 293–5
balanced scorecard 238–49, 256—7
balancing and reinforcing loops 51–2
Barclay Report (1982) 34
Barthel Index 96
bed blockers 37, 55
behaviour and systems 51–2
benchmarking and networking 297–9
benefits 161
Benefits Office 143
BetterCaring 185
‘Better Government for Older People’ (BGOP) initiative 16. 190,206–7, 210
Beveridge, Lord 28–9
Beveridge Report (Social Insurance and Allied Services) 28–9
Bishop, Angela 368
Blair, Nessie 368
blame
culture 50
and dependency, vicious cycle of 37–9
blocked beds 36
blurred boundaries 85, 309–11
body weight 112
boundaries
blurred 85, 309–11
Bourne End Volunteer Bureau 368
Bournewood Community and Mental Health Trust, NW Surrey (RRICS) 363–4
Bowker, Michael 368
Buckinghamshire Health Authority 214,368
Buckinghamshire Social Services 368
Bucks Community Action 214
Buddha 25
burden, shifting the 53–5
Burton, Judith 368
business
and industry, local 142
plan 161–2
Camden Age Concern 208, 210–11
cancer 118
availability of resources for terminal care 349
capturing data 176–7
care
community 34–6, 337–8
as core process 90
domains and subdomains of 106–7
innovative primary 338
long-term 335–8
managers 35
networks of 8 5
outcomes 240–1
planning
at end of life 348–9
how can information system support 173–4
provision for individuals and populations of older people, balancing tensions between 16
relationship of assessment process to care
management 102
training for population-based 81
understanding care processes 169
see also integrated care; primary care
Care and Repair Schemes 36–7
CareDirect 185
carers and community 16
care home 336–7
careworkers and EPICS 358
Carers Centre 250, 340

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