A Companion to the Literature and Culture of the American West

By Nicolas S. Witschi | Go to book overview

Notes on Contributors

Chadwick Allen is Associate Professor of English at The Ohio State University. The author of Blood Narrative: Indigenous Identity in American Indian and Maori Literary and Activist Texts (2002), he also writes about Indians in popular westerns.

Nina Baym is Swanlund Chair and Center for Advanced Study Professor of English Emerita at the University of Illinois. She is General Editor of the Norton Anthology of American Literature, and has published widely on American literary topics, especially on women writers. Her most recent book is Women Writers of the American West, 1833 – 1927 (2011).

Peter J. Blodgett is the H. Russell Smith Foundation Curator of Western American History at the Huntington Library. Since joining the Huntington’s staff in 1985 he has spoken and written widely on various aspects of the history of the American West and is the author of Land of Golden Dreams: California in the Gold Rush Decade 1848 – 1858 (1999).

Neil Campbell is Professor of American Studies and Research Manager at the University of Derby, UK. He has published widely in American studies, including the book American Cultural Studies (with Alasdair Kean). and articles and chapters on John Sayles, Terrence Malick, Robert Frank, J.B. Jackson, and many others. His major research project is an interdisciplinary trilogy on the contemporary American West: The Cultures of the American New West (2000), The Rhizomatic West (2008), and Post Western (forthcoming).

Krista Comer is Associate Professor of English at Rice University in Houston, Texas. Her books include Landscapes of the New West (1999). and Surfer Girls in the New World Order (2010). She is completing a memoir.

Nancy Cook teaches courses in western American studies at the University of Montana, Missoula. Her publications include essays on ranching, on Montana writers, and on authenticity in western American writing.

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