Pomona's Travels

By Frank R. Stockton; A. B. Frost | Go to book overview

Letter Number Ten

CHEDCOMBE, SOMERSETSHIRE

THE place we stopped at on the first night of our cycle trip is named Porlock, and after the walking and the pushing, and the strain on my mind when going down even the smallest hill for fear Jone's rope would give way, I was glad to get there.

The road into Porlock goes down a hill, the steepest I have seen yet, and we all walked down, holding our machines as if they had been fiery coursers. This hill road twists and winds so you can only see part of it at a time, and when we was about half-way down we heard a horn blowing behind us, and looking around there came the mailcoach at full speed, with four horses, with a lot of people on top. As this raging coach passed by it nearly took my breath away, and as soon as I could speak I said to Jone: "Don't you ever say anything in America about having the roads made narrower so that it won't cost so much to keep them in order, for in my opinion it's often the narrow road that leadeth to destruction."

When we got into the town, and my mind really began to grapple with old Porlock, I felt as if I was sliding backward down the slope of the centuries,

-104-

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Pomona's Travels
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations ix
  • Letter Number One 5
  • Letter Number Two 15
  • Letter Number Three 30
  • Letter Number Fou 41
  • Letter Number Five 54
  • Letter Number Six 59
  • Letter Number Seven 68
  • Letter Number Eight 80
  • Letter Number Nine 88
  • Letter Number Ten 104
  • Letter Number Eleven 110
  • Letter Number Twelve 117
  • Letter Number Thirteen 129
  • Letter Number Fourteen 138
  • Letter Number Fifteen 148
  • Letter Number Sixteen 165
  • Letter Number Seventeen 175
  • Letter Number Eighteen 191
  • Letter Number Nineteen 199
  • Letter Number Twenty 211
  • Letter Number Twenty-One 219
  • Letter Number Twenty-Two 226
  • Letter Number Twenty-Three 241
  • Letter Number Twenty-Four 249
  • Letter Number Twenty-Five 257
  • Letter Number Twenty-Six 269
  • Letter Number Twenty-Seven 272
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