Pomona's Travels

By Frank R. Stockton; A. B. Frost | Go to book overview

Letter Number Fifteen

BELL HOTEL, GLOUCESTER

As soon as I jumped on shore, as I told you in my last, and had taken a good grip on Jone's heavy stick, I went for those hogs, for I wanted to drive them off before Jone came ashore, for I didn't want him to think he must come.

I have driven hogs and cows out of lots and yards often enough, as you know yourself, madam, so I just stepped up to the biggest of them and hit him a whack across the head as he was rubbing his nose in among some papers with bits of landscapes on them, as was enough to make him give up studying art for the rest of his life; but would you believe it, madam, instead of running away he just made a bolt at me, and gave me such a push with his head and shoulders he nearly knocked me over? I never was so astonished, for they looked like hogs that you might think could be chased out of a yard by a boy. But I gave the fellow another crack on the back, which he didn't seem to notice, but just turned again to give me another push, and at the same minute the two others stopped rooting among the paint-boxes and came grunting at me.

For the first time in my life I was frightened by

-148-

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Pomona's Travels
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Illustrations ix
  • Letter Number One 5
  • Letter Number Two 15
  • Letter Number Three 30
  • Letter Number Fou 41
  • Letter Number Five 54
  • Letter Number Six 59
  • Letter Number Seven 68
  • Letter Number Eight 80
  • Letter Number Nine 88
  • Letter Number Ten 104
  • Letter Number Eleven 110
  • Letter Number Twelve 117
  • Letter Number Thirteen 129
  • Letter Number Fourteen 138
  • Letter Number Fifteen 148
  • Letter Number Sixteen 165
  • Letter Number Seventeen 175
  • Letter Number Eighteen 191
  • Letter Number Nineteen 199
  • Letter Number Twenty 211
  • Letter Number Twenty-One 219
  • Letter Number Twenty-Two 226
  • Letter Number Twenty-Three 241
  • Letter Number Twenty-Four 249
  • Letter Number Twenty-Five 257
  • Letter Number Twenty-Six 269
  • Letter Number Twenty-Seven 272
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