More Than a Monologue: Sexual Diversity and the Catholic Church - Vol. 1

By Christine Firer Hinze; J. Patrick Hornbeck II | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

We editors owe debts of gratitude to a great many people and organizations, without whose generous contributions this project would not have been possible. We acknowledge, first, the four institutions who hosted the More than a Monologue conferences in the fall of 2011, at which much of the material comprising this two-volume set was originally presented: Fairfield University, Yale Divinity School, Union Theological Seminary, and Fordham University. Special thanks go to the leaders of the organizing committees that proposed, developed, and carried out the events at each of the four sites, in par tic u lar Paul Lakeland at Fairfield, Michael Norko and Diana Swancutt at Yale, and Kelby Harrison at Union. We are deeply grateful to all who supported these conferences: administrators and academic units who contributed resources at Fairfield, Yale, Union, and Fordham, the Arcus Foundation, Geoffrey Knox and Roberta Sklar, and others who provided financial, logistical, and technical support; our many conference volunteers, participants, and attendees; and especially the fortysome speakers and panelists, all of whom generously lent their time, talent, and effort to making the conference series such a great success.

The preparation and publication of this book have been made possible by the talented and dedicated work and assistance of Fredric Nachbaur and his colleagues at Fordham University Press, theology Ph.D. student Amanda Alexander’s excellent and timely editorial assistance, financial support from the Fordham University Office of Research, and intellectual and logistical support from Terrence Tilley and the Fordham Department of Theology. We are also grateful to the three anonymous Fordham University Press reviewers for their suggestions and to Tom Beaudoin and Brad Hinze for their work in reading and co-writing a theological response to the complete set of essays. Most of all, we offer abiding thanks to each of the authors who have so generously opened their lives and shared their stories in order to create this unique collection.

-xi-

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