More Than a Monologue: Sexual Diversity and the Catholic Church - Vol. 1

By Christine Firer Hinze; J. Patrick Hornbeck II | Go to book overview

12 Calling Out in the Wilderness
Queer Youth and American Catholicism

JEANINE E. VIAU

Loyola University Chicago

I did just as I was commanded. I brought out my baggage by day, the
baggage for exile, and in the evening I dug through the wall with my
own hands; I brought it out in the dark, carrying it on my shoulder in
their sight.

Ezekiel 12:7 NRSV

Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick articulates an apt starting point for this reflection: “Seemingly, this society wants its children to know nothing; wants its queer children to conform or (and this is not a figure of speech) die; and wants not to know that it is getting what it wants.”1 Sedgwick’s diagnoses take on flesh in the stories of LGBTQ student activists from two urban Catholic universities, whose stories I collected through open-ended interviews focusing on the connections between gender, sexuality, religion, and activism.2 The recruitment phase of my project coincided with the surge in media and activist attention to the deaths of several gay youth in the early weeks of the fall of 2010.3 In each case, the suicide was connected to reports of antigay bullying. This surge in public attention helped spotlight more than three de cades of research regarding the par tic u lar vulnerability of gender and sexual minority youth to bullying, violence, suicide, and other life-threatening forms of social alienation.4 But despite sustained documentation in clinical, sociological, and educational circles, the social dimensions of these problems have gone largely unaddressed. Even today, as in de cades past, queer youth continue to face widespread and unrelenting hostility within their primary social institutions.5

The term “queer” originated as a derogatory term in the early twentieth century. The term is reclaimed and appropriated in productive ways by gender and sexual diversity theorists, activists, individuals, and communities. However, its history and ongoing negative use raise problems

-124-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
More Than a Monologue: Sexual Diversity and the Catholic Church - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 226

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.