More Than a Monologue: Sexual Diversity and the Catholic Church - Vol. 1

By Christine Firer Hinze; J. Patrick Hornbeck II | Go to book overview

15 A Voice from the Pews

Same-Sex Marriage and Connecticut’s
Kerrigan Decision

MICHAEL A. NORKO

Yale University School of Medicine

On October 10, 2008, the Connecticut Supreme Court announced its decision in Kerrigan v. Commissioner of Public Health.1 The court concluded that the state impermissibly discriminated against individuals on the basis of sexual orientation by not permitting same-sex couples to be married, thus legalizing marriage for same-sex couples. (See Chapter 3 in this volume for the personal narratives of one of the eight couples who were parties to that lawsuit.)

In responding to what it called the “severe and sustained discrimination” against gay persons and to the “long-standing intolerance” of intimate homosexual conduct in our culture, the court was, in my view, making a statement about social justice.2 This perspective resonated with my understanding and appreciation of Catholic social teaching as a lifelong Catholic and later-life divinity student. This was a deep resonance, with roots in the domestic church of my upbringing, in ser vice in Appalachia required as part of my Catholic high school training, in a married life blessed with children, in a career of public sector psychiatry, in years of annual retreats, and in communion with fellow Catholics devoted to serving others. My studies of Catholic social ethics and ecclesiology in divinity school added a dimension of intellectual understanding and historical tradition to these de cades of experiential learning. I was truly gratified to learn of the Kerrigan decision through the media.

That same day, the Connecticut Catholic Conference (CCC), the public policy and advocacy office of the Catholic Bishops in Connecticut, posted its response to the Kerrigan decision on its website.3 The heading declared, in bold letters, “Connecticut Catholic Conference, on behalf of the Catholic bishops, clergy, religious, and laity of the State of Connecticut, condemns today’s Connecticut Supreme Court decision on same-sex ‘marriage’; calls for a ‘Yes’ vote on a Constitutional Convention.”

-157-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
More Than a Monologue: Sexual Diversity and the Catholic Church - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 226

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.