Personal Voices: Chinese Women in the 1980's

By Emily Honig; Gail Hershatter | Go to book overview

Notes

The following abbreviations are used in the Notes and Bibliography. Complete authors' names, titles, and publication data are given in the Bibliography, pp. 363-80.

JPRSJoint Publications Research Service
MFMinzhu yu fazhi
RMRBRenmin ribao
ZFZhongguo funü
ZFBZhongguo funü bao
ZQZhongguo qingnian
ZQBZhongguo qingnian bao

Introduction
1.
For a discusson of the May Fourth Movement, see Chow; Spence; and Schwarcz.
2.
For an analysis of the Party's attempts to mobilize women in the 1920's, see Gilmartin.
3.
See Johnson; Stacey.
4.
For an account of this campaign, and the serious resistance it met in many rural areas, see Johnson, 115-53.
5.
Stacey, 211-16.
6.
For a concise and lucid summary of the political history of the Cultural Revolution, see William Joseph, "Foreword," in Gao Yuan, Born Red; for one person's account of his experiences in that movement, see Gao Yuan.
7.
This point is developed further in Young, "Chicken Little in China."
8.
In addition to the works by Johnson and Stacey mentioned elsewhere in this introduction, the following works have been particularly useful to us: Wolf, Women and the Family in Rural Taiwan; Wolf, Revolution Postponed; Wolf and Witke; Parish and Whyte; Whyte and Parish; Croll, Feminism and Socialism in China; Croll, Chinese Women Since Mao; Diamond; Pasternak; Davin; and the essays in Young, Women in China.

Chapter 1
1.
Gei shaonü de xin, i.
2.
A typical book of advice, Gei shaonü de xin (Letters to Young Women), sketches the lessons that adults want adolescent girls to learn. The book is divided into 26 letters, each supposedly written to a different young woman by an uncle, aunt, teacher, older friend, or cousin. Strong stylistic similarities indicate that the

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Personal Voices: Chinese Women in the 1980's
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1- Growing Up Female 13
  • 2- The Pleasures of Adornment And The Dangers of Sexuality 41
  • 3- Making a Friend: Changing Patterns of Courtship 81
  • 4- Marriage 137
  • 5- Family Relations 167
  • 6- Divorce 206
  • 7- Women and Work 243
  • 8- Violence Against Women 273
  • 9- Feminist Voices 308
  • Conclusion 335
  • Notes 343
  • Bibliography 363
  • Index 381
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