The Nick of Time: Politics, Evolution, and the Untimely

By Elizabeth Grosz | Go to book overview

NOTES

1 Introduction

1 This becomes increasingly more pressing as biomedical research focuses in ever greater detail on the smaller and smaller components of biological existence: hormones, proteins, cells, the gene itself. The more technologies render microscopic elements of the body knowable, the more a philosophical understanding of the place of biology in culture is required as a necessary counterbalance.

2 In Volatile Bodies (Grosz 1994).

3 This is a claim developed with great insight in Pheng Cheah, “Mattering” (1996), and especially in Spectral Nationality (2003).

4 In Space, Time and Perversion (Grosz 1995), where for some strange reason, and in spite of the title, the question of time is barely mentioned; and in Architecture from the Outside (Grosz 2001), where I explore some of the same figures (Bergson, Deleuze, Irigaray) as here, but in terms of their implications for considering space.

5 This concept of the untimely is ultimately Nietzschean, but it has been carefully elaborated by both Derrida (1995b) and Deleuze (1997).

6 Irwin C. Lieb, Past, Present and Future (1991) discusses in more detail than I some of the contributions of these figures regarding the reality of time.

7 See de Landa (1999).

8 While Deleuze (1983) makes clear Nietzsche’s untimeliness, Derrida too is interested in the disruptions of time, in the ghostly, the haunted, that which returns unseasonably (see Derrida 1992, 1995 a, 1995b).

9 This concept of the virtual has been of central concern to a number of theorists in philosophy, cultural studies, and architectural theory for a number of years. See, for example, Kwinter (2001), de Landa (2002), Rajchman (1992, 1998, 2000),

-263-

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The Nick of Time: Politics, Evolution, and the Untimely
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Abbreviations ix
  • Introduction- to the Untimely 1
  • Part I- Darwin and Evolution 15
  • 1- Darwinian Matters- Life, Force, and Change 17
  • 2- Biological Difference 40
  • 3- The Evolution of Sex and Race 64
  • Part II- Nietzsche and Overcoming 93
  • 4- Nietzsche’s Darwin 95
  • 5- History and the Untimely 113
  • 6- The Eternal Return and the Overman 135
  • Part III- Bergson and Becoming 153
  • 7- Bergsonian Difference 155
  • 8- The Philosophy of Life 185
  • 9- Intuition and the Virtual 215
  • Conclusion- the Future 244
  • Notes 263
  • References 297
  • Index 309
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