An Expendable Man: The Near-Execution of Earl Washington, Jr.

By Margaret Edds | Go to book overview

Index
Allen, George, 141–42, 145, 154
American Association on Mental Retardation, 177, 208
Anti-Terrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act, 203
Appeals procedure in capital cases, 6; predisposed to uphold trial verdicts, 8; process, 78–79; reversal rates in Virginia, 79–80. See also Capital punishment, in Virginia, counsel at trial; Capital punishment in Virginia, counsel on appeals; habeas appeals
Arc (formerly Association of Retarded Citizens), 144, 148
Aronhalt, Gary, 198
Atkins v. Virginia, 207–8
Ban, Jeffrey, 139
Barnabei, Derek, 183
Barratt, Patricia, 68
Bassette, Herbert, 146
Bennett, John, 14, 104–6; evidentiary hearing, 122, 124; 4th Circuit ruling, 127; trial, 47, 50–68
Berry, David, 46, 70, 106
Beyer, James, 51
Bikel, Ofra, 166–72, 198
Bing, David, 135, 138, 143, 172
Blackwell, Armistead and Elizabeth, 18
Bloodsworth, Kirk, 134
Blue blanket, 14, 199, 203; attempt to get DNA test results, 161; Close refuses to turn over, 182; DNA tests, 153, 166–72, 180; federal habeas appeals, 117, 121–28; Hall discovery, 102; state habeas appeals, 104, 108, 110
Blue shirt: Close refuses to turn over, 182; federal habeas appeals, 118–19, 128; preliminary hearing, 105; state habeas, 107, 109; trial, 59–60, 65–66. See also Hair tests
Boger, John, 85, 87
Bonnie, Richard, 136
Briley, James and Linwood, 4–5, 69, 120
Bronson, Edward, 90
Brundage, Paul, 12–13, 51
Buraker, Kenneth H., 13, 51, 101
Butzner, John, 114, 116, 126, 130; dissent, 127–28
Campbell, Doris, 12, 51
Capital punishment in U.S., 203

-235-

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An Expendable Man: The Near-Execution of Earl Washington, Jr.
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Timeline xi
  • 1 - Countdown 1
  • 2 - Death in Culpeper 10
  • 3 - A Piedmont Son 16
  • 4 - Arrest 27
  • 5 - Confessions 35
  • 6 - The Trial 45
  • 7 - Prisoner 69
  • 8 - Deadline 83
  • 9 - A Discovery 96
  • 10 - Appeals 113
  • 11 - Strategies 130
  • 12 - An Ending 152
  • 13 - Revival 166
  • 14 - Freedom Delayed 184
  • 15 - The Aftermath 196
  • Notes 213
  • Recommended Reading 231
  • Index 235
  • About the Author 243
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