I Hid It under the Sheets: Growing Up with Radio

By Gerald Eskenazi | Go to book overview

Chapter 2
Home

Imagine that there was a time in America when a child sat next to a radio and simply listened. But not just listen, be enthralled and know that this time was his alone, that he was part of the vortex of drama unfolding inside the radio’s innards.

In my pre-teen years, the only radio in the house was in the living room, so I would sit on the floor, my head next to the big box, and listen. All by myself. By then, around 5 p.m., my grandmother already was preparing dinner. My grandfather was virtually deaf, and he would make the effort to listen to radio only for special occasions—Sunday night, when Walter Winchell was on, or after supper at night during the week, when the news was presented by Gabriel Heatter, who began every program with, “Ah, there’s good news tonight!” (And whose daughter, Maida Heatter, is the noted cookbook author.)

My mother, meanwhile, was on her way home from work, riding the subway, and my Uncle Arthur was in England during the war, and then in school when he returned from overseas.

My mother worked sewing women’s hats, an industry that once upon a time was quite important in New York. She got paid by the hat—piece work, it was called—and the more she worked, the more she earned. So she often worked until 6 o’clock at night, as well as on Saturdays when the busy season was under way. It meant that she was never there to see me in a school play, or when I captured my public school spelling championship and came close to being a finalist for the National Spelling Bee. Nor did she ever meet any of my teachers, or know my friends’ mothers.

-8-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
I Hid It under the Sheets: Growing Up with Radio
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Chapter 1 - The Box 1
  • Chapter 2 - Home 8
  • Chapter 3 - Daytime 18
  • Chapter 4 - Playing Hooky 21
  • Chapter 5 - Life Imitating Art 44
  • Chapter 6 - Weekends 67
  • Chapter 7 - News 81
  • Chapter 8 - Why They Mattered 86
  • Chapter 9 - Good Humor 109
  • Chapter 10 - Why I Drank That Horrible Ovaltine 114
  • Chapter 11 - Sports on the Airwaves! 123
  • Chapter 12 - My Feminine Side 129
  • Chapter 13 - Fabulous Escapes 140
  • Chapter 14 - More Magic 144
  • Chapter 15 - The Opposite Sex 155
  • Chapter 16 - The Backlash 159
  • Chapter 17 - Different Time, Different Station 171
  • Other Books by Gerald Eskenazi 179
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 180

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.