The Experience of God: A Postmodern Response

By Kevin Hart; Barbara E. Wall | Go to book overview

12
The Twilight of the Idols and the Night of
the Senses

JEFFREY BLOECHL

The question of experience of God may be taken to respond to the thought that experience of God has become questionable. Heard in this way, the question summons the idea that what we call “God” is in fact not God, whether this is taken to mean simply that there is no God or that God is somehow other or more than what we say. The fact that the experience of God can be the theme of questioning and inquiry thus informs us that reflection on the experience of God is always accompanied by doubt, whether this doubt is only the leading edge of violent suspicion or the first gesture of desire for intimacy with the true God. Following this line, one may observe these two possibilities to meet and challenge one another in the wake of the death of God. For some, the death of God signifies the realization that “God” is an idea that has somehow outlived its usefulness and plausibility. For others it signifies only that God is beyond usefulness and plausibility—which is not to say that God is either useless or implausible.

This debate over the meaning of the death of God permits us to see that the difference between a claim that God is no longer plausible and a claim that God is beyond all criteria of plausibility— between a refusal of God and an elevated faith in God—is concentrated in conflicting notions of what constitutes an idol, and of what would be required to transcend it. Does idolatry appear in the faith in God that falls short of God, or already in faith itself?

-156-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Experience of God: A Postmodern Response
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 263

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.