By Faith Alone: Essays on Justification in Honor of Gerhard O. Forde

By Joseph A. Burgess; Marc Kolden | Go to book overview

Introduction: Gerhard O. Forde
and the Doctrine of Justification

Joseph A. Burgess and Marc Kolden

The Lutheran confessions call the doctrine of justification by faith alone the “chief article” of the Christian faith.1 This constitutes the major contribution of the Lutheran reformers to the wider Christian community both in the sixteenth century and in various ways ever since.

It is not surprising that a Lutheran theologian in the second half of the twentieth century might choose to devote most of his career to probing the depths and developing the implications of the doctrine of justification. What is surprising is that so few theologians actually have done this. In the judgment of the editors of this volume, Gerhard Forde’s teaching and publications, his public lectures and sermons, and his contributions to ecumenical scholarship and debate represent one of the most sustained and important contributions to a theological understanding of justification by faith in the second half of the twentieth century.

It has been remarked that the problem with the doctrine of justification is not that it has been tried and found wanting but that it has never been tried. After reading Professor Forde’s writings, with their exposition of the radicality of justification by faith alone, apart from works, it becomes more obvious why it has been tried so seldom: the doctrine itself is an attack on the self-justification that controls every human heart. This is no less true if that person is the theologian who is seeking to hold and commend the doctrine! Perhaps it is for this reason that the reader often not only is challenged and enriched at an intellectual level by Forde’s work but also is encountered at a spiritual level — in terms of judgment,

1. See Ap 4:2 and SA 2:1, 1-5.

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
By Faith Alone: Essays on Justification in Honor of Gerhard O. Forde
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 350

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.