By Faith Alone: Essays on Justification in Honor of Gerhard O. Forde

By Joseph A. Burgess; Marc Kolden | Go to book overview

The Eschatological Significance
of Justification for Preaching

Roy A. Harrisville


Introduction

One way by which to discuss the topic would be to put the question whether or not any eschatological significance attaches to justification; next, to attempt to adduce proof for it by referring to passages in the New Testament that deal with the concept and might allow for such significance; then to indicate the various components belonging to that connotation; and in conclusion to inquire into the relevance of such inquiry for preaching. This would be the synthetic approach.

Another way would be simply to choose a text dealing with justification that is clearly eschatological in nature and pick it apart, ringing the changes on it — the so-called analytic approach, which I have decided to take. Its obvious weakness is one that attaches to any analytic study, viz., that of concentrating on a particular without attending to the whole. But its weakness does not rob it of legitimacy. (If so, exegesis would have been eliminated from the curriculum long ago!) The strength of this approach is that it forces one to return ever and anon to the particular, how

Dedication: This poor piece is dedicated to my friend of many years, Gerhard Olaf Forde. Whether or not he approves of it is irrelevant because of what has seized and will not separate us — a persuasion respecting the sovereignty of a God who has acted supremely in the death of the “Man of His Own Choosing.” We give voice to that persuasion differently — he in orderly fashion, I often distractedly — but it is one by which we have always lived and which still arouses our passion. Gratulare, “Episcopus!”

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