King Football: Sport and Spectacle in the Golden Age of Radio and Newsreels, Movies and Magazines, the Weekly & the Daily Press

By Michael Oriard | Go to book overview

Notes

Articles from newspapers are given full citations here and do not appear in the bibliography. Short stories from the Saturday Evening Post and Collier’s are cited with their year of publication, to locate them in Appendix C; all other magazine fiction and nonfiction receive brief citations here and appear in the bibliography.

All radio broadcasts are from the Library of Congress, Motion Picture, Broadcasting and Recorded Sound Division.

Universal newsreels are from the National Archives, College Park, Maryland; Hearst newsreels (Metrotone News and News of the Day) are from the Film and TV Archive at UCLA. Information on Fox Movietone News is from an in-house database of surviving footage, and information on Pathé and Paramount newsreels is from a database on CD-ROM owned by Raymond Fielding, dean of the Florida State University Film School.


ABBREVIATIONS
ACAtlanta Constitution
AHAmerican Hebrew
CDChicago Defender
CTChicago Tribune
DMNDallas Morning News
DWDaily Worker
LATLos Angeles Times
NYANNew York Amsterdam News
NYDNNew York Daily News
NYHTNew York Herald Tribune
NYTNew York Times
OWHOmaha World-Herald
PCPittsburgh Courier
POPortland Oregonian
SEPSaturday Evening Post

INTRODUCTION

1. Harris, King Football; Wechsler, Revolt on the Campus.

2. “Hail, King Football!”; Trevor, “King Football Answers the Depression”; “Here Comes King Football,” PO, 2 September 1934; Sullivan, “Football Is King”; “To All Colleges”; Smick, “King Football”; and Ronald J. Kidd, introduction to Ratliff, Autumn’s Mightiest Legions.

3. Watterson, College Football, 93–98, 120–40.

4. See Jable, “Birth of Professional Football”; and Peterson, Pigskin, 23–44.

5. “War Football,” NYT, 23 November 1919.

6. See, for example, Towers, “Athletics’ Aid to War”; and Tuthill, “Football and War.”

-383-

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King Football: Sport and Spectacle in the Golden Age of Radio and Newsreels, Movies and Magazines, the Weekly & the Daily Press
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction 1
  • I - In the Kingdom of Football 21
  • 1 - Reading, Watching, & Listening to Football 23
  • 2 - Local Football 65
  • 3 - Who Cares about Reform? 101
  • 4 - Players’ or Coaches’ Whose Game Is It? 126
  • 5 - Gridiron, U.S.a 162
  • 6 - Sanctioning Savagery 199
  • II - What We Think about When We Think about Football 223
  • 7 - Class? 225
  • 8 - Ethnicity 255
  • 9 - Race 283
  • 10 - Masculinity 328
  • Epilogue- Into the Age of Television 364
  • Appendix A - Football Films, 1920–1960 371
  • Appendix B - Football Covers on the Saturday Evening Post and Collier’s, 1920–1960 374
  • Appendix C - Football Fiction in the Saturday Evening Post and Collier’s, 1920–1960 378
  • Notes 383
  • Bibliography 435
  • Index 471
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