A Southern Family in White & Black: The Cuneys of Texas

By Douglas Hales | Go to book overview

NOTES

CHAPTER I

1. Mary Boykin Chesnut, A Diary from Dixie, p. 22; Eugene D. Genovese, Roll, Jordan, Roll: The World the Slaves Made, p. 416. Philip Cuney’s last name was originally spelled “Cuny” and is first spelled with an added “e” in Texas legislative records and in newspapers of the time. While his white descendants continued the traditional spelling, Philip’s black descendants adopted the added “e.”

2. Joel Williamson, New People: Miscegenation and Mulattoes in the United States, pp. 42–43. Gregg Cantrell, in Kenneth and John B. Rayner and the Limits of Southern Dissent, offers a variation on Williamson’s maverick idea. He argues that Kenneth Rayner, a North Carolina politician and slaveholder who freed his mulatto son, John, and provided him an education, did so as a dissent from the dominate antebellum views on slavery.

3. G. M. G. Stafford, The Wells Family of Louisiana and Allied Families, pp. 144–51.

4. Stafford, Wells Family, pp. 146–51; Maud Cuney-Hare, Norris Wright Cuney: A Tribune of the Black People, pp. 1–2. Retreating Yankees burned Alexandria’s courthouse in 1863, destroying abstracts, land records, and other county records of Rapides Parish. Knowledge of the early settlement of the area consequently comes from secondary materials. Apparently, the marriage of the widow Cuney to Caesar Archinard caused Maud Cuney-Hare to mistakenly identify her grandfather’s ancestors as Swiss in the biography of her father. While another source identifies the Cuneys as being of French descent, Stafford’s account, which relied on the Cuney family Bible, appears more reliable.

5. J. Frank Dobie, “Jim Bowie, Big Dealer,” Southwestern Historical Quarterly 60 (Jan., 1957): 342; G. P. Whittington, “Rapides Parish, Louisiana: A History,” Louisiana Historical Quarterly 18 (Oct., 1933): 629.

6. Whittington, “Rapides Parish,” pp. 629–30; William C. Davis, Three Roads to the Alamo: The Lives and Fortunes of David Crockett, James Bowie, and William Barret Travis, pp. 212–15. Davis presents the best account of the famous duel, but even his account differs with others on what actually took place.

-143-

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A Southern Family in White & Black: The Cuneys of Texas
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Chapter 1 - Politician and Slaveholder 3
  • Chapter 2 - Labor and Civic Leader 15
  • Chapter 3 - Political Education, 1869–83 40
  • Chapter 4 - New Leader of the Party 60
  • Chapter 5 - Party and Patronage 77
  • Chapter 6 - Maud Cuney 94
  • Chapter 7 - Musician, Director, Writer 108
  • Chapter 8 - Conclusion 138
  • Notes 143
  • Bibliography 163
  • Index 169
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