Where Are You? An Ontology of the Cell Phone

By Maurizio Ferraris; Sarah De Sanctis | Go to book overview

Part I
PERÌ MAIL: THE PHARAOH’S
MOBILE PHONE

On November 6, 1824, from Egypt, Champollion wrote to his brother: “I passed my hands over the names of years which History has completely lost record of, the names of Gods who have had no altar raised to them for fifteen centuries, and, hardly breathing for fear of reducing it to dust, I collected a certain tiny piece of papyrus, the last and only resting place of the memory of a King who, when alive, may have found the immense Palace of Karnak too confining for him!” Ah, if only the pharaoh had had a mobile phone! Yes, had he owned one, and had the reception been good in the pyramid, what would he have done with it? He would have spoken, of course, but mostly he would have written, recorded, constructed. To verify this claim, I will develop the following topics in Part I:

1. Speaking. “Is that you, my love?” “No, I’m her husband.” Here is the point. There is a big difference between being on the phone and being on a mobile phone. In Heideggerian terms, it would be a “being-on-the-phone” versus a very different “being-on-the-mobile-phone.” With the mobile phone, a sentence like “Hello, is this the Heideggers? Can I speak with Martin?” ceased to exist. No, the message—apart from unpleasant accidents— reaches him and not someone in his family; yet, on the other hand, he could be anywhere. Used as we are to finding someone, when we do not manage to do so it makes us feel rather anxious. The most menacing of all messages is, “The number you have called is currently unavailable.” Vice versa, a real ontological isolation takes place when we find out that there is no reception and we start looking for it, frantically. We feel lonely, yet until fairly recently

-9-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Where Are You? An Ontology of the Cell Phone
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword- Truth and the Mobile Phone vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Translator’s Note xiii
  • Introduction- Where Are You? 1
  • Part I- Perì Mail- The Pharaoh’s Mobile Phone 9
  • 1- Speaking 11
  • 2- Writing 44
  • 3- Recording 71
  • 4- Constructing 101
  • The Bottle Imp 119
  • Part II- Social Objects- Realism and Textualism 121
  • 5- Strong Realism 123
  • 6- Strong Textualism 132
  • 7- Weak Realism 140
  • 8- Weak Textualism 161
  • Epilogue 183
  • Notes 185
  • References 213
  • Index 229
  • Commonalities 231
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 232

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.