CliffsNotes Wharton's The Age of Innocence

By Susan Van Kirk | Go to book overview

Index

A
Academy of Music, 15
Age of Innocence, The: A Novel of Ironic Nostalgia (Wagner-Martin), 70
Age of Innocence, The (film, directed by Moeller), 72
Age of Innocence, The (film, directed by Ruggles), 72
Age of Innocence, The (film, directed by Scorsese), 7, 72
Age of Innocence, The (Wharton)
ending of, 8
interpretation and critical reception of, 7
publication of, 5
American Hostels for Refugees, 4
American Writers’ Edith Wharton Video Lesson Plan Web site, 71
appearance as everything theme, 65
Archer, Dallas, 55, 68
Archer, Janey, 11, 55
Archer, Mary, 55
Archer, May Welland. See Welland, May
Archer, Mrs., 11, 32
Archer, Newland
affair of, 26
character of, 10, 15, 58
conflicted feelings of, 24, 25, 39, 50
defense of Ellen, 19–20, 25
Ellen and, 30, 40, 47, 50–51, 68
employment of, 25
European compared to American values and, 28
fantasy life of, 39–40, 56, 60
flight to Florida, 30
Mrs. Manson, conversation with, 32
May and, 25, 39, 43, 47, 50–51
Mrs. Mingott, conversation with, 32
mother and sister, conversation with, 32
protective instincts of, 24–25
rationalization for own behavior, 50
realization of, 47
restlessness of, 39
as romantic, 46
view of May and her mother, 31
web of lies of, 46
“At least it was you who made me understand…”, 68
Atlantic Monthly, The, 2

B
Backward Glance, A (Wharton), 5, 70
Beaufort, Fanny, 55
Beaufort, Julius
character of, 11
dishonor of, 46
fall from favor by, 38, 42, 65
on May, 39
as New Rich, 18
Beaufort, Regina, 11, 42, 46, 60, 61
Berenson, Bernard, 4
Berry, Walter, 2–3, 4, 5
Book of the Homeless, The (Wharton), 4
Buccaneers, The (Wharton), 5
“But I’m afraid you can’t, dear…”, 68

C
change in society, theory of, 42
characters in book, 10–12. See also specific characters
Children of Flanders Rescue Committee, 4
class, separate worlds based on, 29–30
CliffsNotes Web site, iv, 70
Codman, Ogden
Decoration of Houses, The, 3
as friend, 5
Custom of the Country, The (Wharton), 4, 5

D
Davis, Joy L., “Rituals of Dining in Edith Wharton’s The Age of Innocence, The,” 71
Decoration of Houses, The (Wharton and Codman), 3
Descent of Man, The (Wharton), 4
Displaying Women: Spectacles of Leisure in Edith Wharton’s New York (Montgomery), 70
divorce, 28
double standard
marriage and, 15, 20
sexual liaisons and, 18, 26, 58
dramatic tension, 32
duty, 58, 63–64

-73-

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CliffsNotes Wharton's The Age of Innocence
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Table of Contents iii
  • How to Use This Book iv
  • Life and Background of the Author 1
  • Introduction to the Novel 6
  • Critical Commentaries 13
  • Book 1- Chapter I 14
  • Chapters II-III 17
  • Chapters IV-VI 19
  • Chapters VII-VIII 21
  • Chapters IX-XI 23
  • Chapters XII-XIII 27
  • Chapters XIV-XV 29
  • Chapters XVI-XVII 31
  • Chapter XVIII 33
  • Book 2- Chapters XIX-XX 35
  • Chapters XXI-XXIV 37
  • Chapters XXV-XXVI 41
  • Chapters XXVII-XXX 44
  • Chapters XXXI-XXXIII 48
  • Chapter XXXIV 53
  • Character Analyses 57
  • Critical Essay 62
  • CliffsNotes Review 67
  • Index 73
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