VIII

ON a June afternoon of the year 1875 one of the biggest carriages in London drew up before one of the smallest houses in Mayfair--the very smallest in that exclusive quarter, its occupant, Miss Jacqueline March, always modestly averred.

The tiny dwelling, a mere two-windowed wedge, with a bulging balcony under a striped awning, had been newly painted a pale buff, and freshly festooned with hanging pink geraniums and intensely blue lobelias. The carriage, on the contrary, a vast old-fashioned barouche of faded yellow, with impressive armorial bearings, and coachman and footman to scale, showed no signs of recent renovation; and the lady who descended from it was, like her conveyance, large and rather shabby though undeniably impressive.

A freshly starched parlour-maid let her in with a curtsey of recognition. "Miss March is in the drawingroom, my lady." She led the visitor up the narrow stairs and announced from the threshold: "Please, Miss, Lady Brightlingsea."

Two ladies sat in the drawing-room in earnest talk. One of the two was vaguely perceived by Lady Brightlingsea to be small and brown, with burning black eyes which did not seem to go with her stiff purple poplin and old-fashioned beaded dolman.

The other lady was also very small, but extremely fair

-95-

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The Buccaneers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Book I 1
  • II 15
  • III 24
  • IV 37
  • V 47
  • VI 62
  • VII 75
  • Book II 93
  • VIII 95
  • IX 106
  • X 119
  • XI 130
  • XII 142
  • XIII 155
  • XIV 167
  • XV 177
  • XVI 188
  • XVII 211
  • XVIII 229
  • Book III 237
  • XX 249
  • XXI 264
  • XXII 275
  • XXIII 288
  • XXIV 297
  • XXV 308
  • XXVI 322
  • XXVII 332
  • XXIX 351
  • A Note on the Buccaneers 360
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