XVII

UNDER the fixed smile of the Folyat Raphael the Duchess of Tintagel sat at breakfast opposite two of her many daughters, the Ladies Almina Folyat and Gwendolen de Lurey.

When the Duke was present he reserved to himself the right to glance through the morning papers between his cup of tea and his devilled kidneys; but in his absence his mother exercised the privilege, and had the Morning Post placed before her as one of her jealously guarded rights.

She always went straight to the Court Circular, and thence (guided by her mother's heart) to the Fashionable Marriages; and now, after a brief glance at the latter, she threw down the journal with a sudden exclamation.

"Oh, Mamma, what is it?" both daughters cried in alarm. Lady Almina thought wistfully: "Probably somebody else she had hopes of for Ermie or me is engaged," and Lady Gwendolen de Lurey, who had five children, and an invalid husband with a heavily mortgaged estate, reflected, as she always did when she heard of a projected marriage in high life, that when her own engagement had been anounced every one took it for granted that Colonel de Lurey would inherit within the year the immense fortune of a paralyzed uncle--who after all was still alive. "So there's no use planning in advance," Lady Gwendolen concluded wearily, glancing at the clock to

-211-

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The Buccaneers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Book I 1
  • II 15
  • III 24
  • IV 37
  • V 47
  • VI 62
  • VII 75
  • Book II 93
  • VIII 95
  • IX 106
  • X 119
  • XI 130
  • XII 142
  • XIII 155
  • XIV 167
  • XV 177
  • XVI 188
  • XVII 211
  • XVIII 229
  • Book III 237
  • XX 249
  • XXI 264
  • XXII 275
  • XXIII 288
  • XXIV 297
  • XXV 308
  • XXVI 322
  • XXVII 332
  • XXIX 351
  • A Note on the Buccaneers 360
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