XXI

GUY THWARTE had not been back at Honourslove long enough to expect a heavy mail beside his breakfast plate. His four years in Brazil had cut him off more completely than he had realized from his former life; and he was still in the somewhat painful stage of picking up the threads.

"Only one letter? Lucky devil, I envy you!" grumbled Sir Helmsley, taking his seat at the other end of the table and impatiently pushing aside a stack of newspapers, circulars and letters.

The young man glanced with a smile at his father's correspondence. He knew so well of what it consisted: innumerable bills, dunning letters, urgent communications from book-makers, tradesmen, the chairman of political committees or art-exhibitions, scented notes from enamoured ladies, or letters surmounted by mysterious symbols from astrologers, palmists or alchemists--for Sir Helmsley had dabbled in most of the arts, and bent above most of the mysteries. But today, as usual, his son observed, the bills and the dunning letters predominated. Guy would have to put some order into that; and probably into the scented letters too.

"Yes, I'm between two worlds yet--'powerless to be born' kind of feeling," he said as he took up the solitary note beside his own plate. The writing was unknown to him, and he opened the envelope with indifference.

-264-

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The Buccaneers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Book I 1
  • II 15
  • III 24
  • IV 37
  • V 47
  • VI 62
  • VII 75
  • Book II 93
  • VIII 95
  • IX 106
  • X 119
  • XI 130
  • XII 142
  • XIII 155
  • XIV 167
  • XV 177
  • XVI 188
  • XVII 211
  • XVIII 229
  • Book III 237
  • XX 249
  • XXI 264
  • XXII 275
  • XXIII 288
  • XXIV 297
  • XXV 308
  • XXVI 322
  • XXVII 332
  • XXIX 351
  • A Note on the Buccaneers 360
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