Lines 194–606

Summary

In the land of the Geats, today soudiwestern Sweden, the most powerful of all living warriors—Beowulf—hears of Hrothgar’s dilemma. A nephew and thane of King Hygelac, Beowulf carefully chooses 14 of the finest warriors in Geadand to sail to Denmark. A retainer of Hrothgar, assigned to guarding the coast, spots Beowulf and his men when they land and leads the group to Heorot. Almost everyone is impressed with Beowulf’s noble stature, enormous size, and obvious strength. Hrothgar’s herald, Wulfgar, strongly urges the king to meet with Beowulf and the Geats. Hrothgar needs little convincing. He once protected Beowulf’s now deceased father, Ecgtheow, from a blood feud and knew Beowulf when he was a boy. Hrothgar has already heard that Beowulf has the strength of 30 men in his hand-grip and welcomes the visitors.

Beowulf confirms to Hrothgar that he is there to do battle with the ogre who terrorizes Heorot. The young warrior states his credentials: He has destroyed a tribe of giants, defeated sea monsters in night fight, and returned from battle covered with the blood of his enemies. He has driven trouble out of his native land. Beowulf states that he will fight Grendel without armor or sword, hand to claw, because the ogre does not use weapons. If Beowulf is killed, he wants his war-shirt (breast armor, mail) returned to King Hygelac. Hrothgar offers a joyful feast in honor of Beowulf’s arrival. The good cheer is interrupted by Unferth, a top thane of Hrothgar, who insults Beowulf and questions his reputation.


Commentary

Beowulf’s motives for sailing to Denmark are complex. First, he is a young warrior eager to earn glory and enhance his reputation. He can expect to be rewarded well if he is victorious. Second, he is on a lifelong quest of honor; only through fame and honor can a warrior hope to gain a measure of immortality. Finally, and probably most importantly, there is an implication that Beowulf’s family owes a debt to

-22-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
CliffsNotes, Beowulf
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Table of Contents v
  • How to Use This Book vi
  • Life and Background of the Poet 1
  • Introduction to Beowulf 5
  • Critical Commentaries 17
  • Lines 1 - 193 18
  • Lines 194 - 606 22
  • Lines 607 - 836 26
  • Lines 837 - 1062 30
  • Lines 1063 - 1250 33
  • Lines 1251 - 1491 36
  • Lines 1492 - 1650 39
  • Lines 1651 - 1887 42
  • Lines 1888 - 2199 45
  • Lines 2200 - 2400 49
  • Lines 2401 - 2630 53
  • Lines 2631 - 2820 56
  • Lines 2821 - 3182 59
  • Character Analyses 62
  • Critical Essays 71
  • CliffsNotes Review 79
  • CliffsNotes Resource Center 82
  • Index 86
  • Notes 90
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 93

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.