From Rage to Responsibility: Black Conservative Jesse Lee Peterson and America Today

By Jesse Lee Peterson; Brad Stetson | Go to book overview

Chapter Four
THE PROBLEM WITH ABORTION

How dare you tell women abortion is wrong! For many women,
especially black women, abortion means personal freedom!

A black woman who manages an inner-city abortion clinic,
confronting Jesse during his protest of her business.

It is one of the great ironies of our time that those who pass for “black leaders” are so vocal about every perceived racial slight, and yet are not only silent—but even supportive—of the most overt and destructive attack on black Americans: abortion on demand.

Abortion is unique among political issues. While debates about affirmative action, gerrymandering, and tax policy are important, they are not life and death issues. Abortion is. It is an undeniable fact that every abortion kills a human being.1 And it is an undeniable fact that the practice of abortion in this country is immensely harmful, first to the pre-born human being it kills, but then also in less obvious ways to the woman who aborts, to the man who participates in abortion, and to the larger culture.

Since abortion—even though it is the primary skirmish of the contemporary culture war—is still a topic shrouded in mystery and misinformation, I will first bring before us the true nature and meaning of abortion, then focus on its significance for black America (a subject profoundly underdiscussed). I will conclude this chapter by examining what abortion practice does to human relationships, including how it affects the most important purpose in a man’s life: fatherhood.

-52-

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