From Rage to Responsibility: Black Conservative Jesse Lee Peterson and America Today

By Jesse Lee Peterson; Brad Stetson | Go to book overview

Chapter Five
THE PROBLEM WITH IMMIGRATION

Look, we’re here now, we’re not the minority, you are, so shut up!

Hispanic activist, yelling at Jesse Peterson during a rally
protesting illegal immigration in Southern California.

The United States is, of course, a country of immigrants, built on the labor of immigrants—both voluntary and, in the horrific case of black slaves, forced. But it is one of the glories of our land that it has welcomed so many people from all points of confusion across the globe, and that for most of its history it has extended the opportunities of a lifetime to immigrants and their families. American generosity is beyond question, and it far outstrips that of any other nation, particularly those whose citizens flee in such prodigious numbers to our land.

But there is a problem today: in some parts of the country, particularly Southern California and South Texas, Hispanic immigration is so massive and culturally overwhelming, that it has disenfranchised poor American citizens, almost always black ones. Compounding this problem for black Americans in these areas, a significant percentage of this Hispanic immigration is illegal. This fact increases the frustration and dismay felt by many blacks, because they see the injustice of lawbreakers going unpunished, and non-Americans benefiting from the American system at black Americans’ expense.

Of course, the extent of illegal immigration in these regions and elsewhere is notoriously difficult to ascertain, since government officers are afraid to investigate the matter for fear of being labeled by Hispanic activists as “racist,” and since it is nonsensi-

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