Listening to Young People in School, Youth Work, and Counselling

By Nick Luxmoore | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

This book was originally written as a series of occasional articles for friends and colleagues. My idea was to explore the overlaps between various ways of working with and thinking about young people. Until recently I managed a counselling and information service for young people and worked as a secondary school counsellor. I used to be a teacher and used to run a youth centre.

Versions of some of the chapters have been published variously by the British Psychodrama Association, the Oxford Psychotherapy Society Oxfordshire County Council and the Peer Support Networker (Roehampton Institute, London).

I’m grateful to the many people whose ideas and experience have informed my thinking and whose trust and support have allowed me to do my work.

I’m also grateful to Penguin UK and to Alfred A. Knopf, a division of Random House Inc. for permission to quote from Albert Camus’ The Outsider, to Methuen Publishing Ltd. for permission to quote from Edward Bond’s play, The Sea; to PBJ Management for permission to quote from Harry Enfield and Chums; to Windswept Music (London) Ltd for permission to quote from Joni Mitchell’s song, ‘All I want’; to International Music Publications for permission to quote from Sandy Denny’s song, ‘What is true?’ © Jardiniere Music/Intersong Music Ltd., from The Doors’ song, ‘People are strange’, © Nipper Music Co. Inc./Doors Music Co, USA, and from Supergrass’ song, ‘Alright’, words and music by Daniel Goffey Gareth Coombes and Michael Quinn © 1995 EMI Music Publishing Ltd. London WC2H OEA, reproduced by permission of International Music Publications Ltd. I’m grateful to The Society of Authors as the literary representative of the estate of A.E. Housman for permission to quote two lines from ‘poem XII, Last Poems’ from The Collected Poems of A.E. Housman, ©1922 by Henry Holt and Co., © 1950 by Barclays Bank Ltd. My best attempts to contact J. Patrick Lewis for permission to quote from his poem, ‘New Baby’, have so far failed. If anyone can let me know of the author’s correct whereabouts I will rectify this.

-8-

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