LIST OF CHARACTERS

Addie Bundren

The dying mother, who has ordered her coffin to be built under her window and who has extracted a promise from her family that they will take her to Jefferson to bury her.


Anse Bundren

Her bumbling and ineffectual husband, who is anxious to take Addie to Jefferson so he can get some false teeth.


Cash

Their oldest son, who is the carpenter and who builds the coffin for Addie. He is about twenty-nine.


Darl

The second son, about twenty-eight. He is the son most given to introspection and thought.


Jewel

The violent son, who owns the horse and who is ten years younger than Darl.


Dewey Dell

The sixteen-year-old, unmarried pregnant daughter who is trying to find a way to have an abortion.


Vardaman

The youngest son. His age is never given.


Vernon Tull

The helpful neighbor who has helped Anse so long that he can’t quit now.


Cora

His wife, who spews forth self-righteous religious axioms.


Peabody

The town doctor, who weighs over two hundred pounds.


Samson

The neighbor where the Bundrens spend the first night of the journey.


Armstid

Another country farmer who helps the Bundrens during the journey.


Whitfield

The preacher who years ago had an affair with Addie and who conducts her funeral.


Moseley

The ethical druggist in a small town who is indignant at Dewey Dell’s request that he help her with an abortion.


MacGowan

An unethical druggist’s assistant who deceives Dewey Dell.

-5-

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As I Lay Dying: Notes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Life and Background of the Author 2
  • Introduction to the Novel 4
  • List of Characters 5
  • Critical Commentaries 6
  • Character Analyses 25
  • Critical Essays 27
  • Essay Topics and Review Questions 33
  • Selected Bibliography 34
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