ESSAY TOPICS AND REVIEW QUESTIONS

1. Why does Faulkner use so many individual narrators?

2. What is gained by using so many separate narrators?

3. Why are many scenes narrated by people outside the Bundren Family?

4. Why does Jewel narrate only one short section?

5. Why does Vardaman confuse his mother with a fish?

6. How is this pathetic confusion made comic later on?

7. Why does Addie’s section come in the middle of the journey after she has been dead for several days?

8. Addie maintains that words are useless. How is this concept supported by Anse and the preacher Whitfield?

9. Other than the fact that Cash is a good carpenter, why is he chosen to build the coffin?

10. Why is Darl used to narrate most of the sections, particularly the ones where some important event is occurring?

11. Why does Dewey Dell hate Darl so intensely?

12. What is the meaning of Darl’s taunt, “Jewel’s mother is a horse”?

13. Write an essay proving that Darl is sane.

14. Give as much support as possible to the proposition that seen against the Bundren world, Darl is insane.

15. Write an essay defining Addie’s relationship to her children.

16. Write an essay discussing how the comic aspects of the novel help modify the grotesque or horrible aspects of the journey.

17. Using this novel as your basis, distinguish between scenes that are comic and pathetic, or between the tragic and the grotesque. Cite as many specific examples as possible.

18. Explain the purpose of the outside narrator. Does this purpose remain the same throughout the novel?

19. Develop Darl’s relationship to Addie, to Anse, and to the other members of the family.

20. Write an essay showing Darl as the defeated idealist.

-33-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
As I Lay Dying: Notes
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Life and Background of the Author 2
  • Introduction to the Novel 4
  • List of Characters 5
  • Critical Commentaries 6
  • Character Analyses 25
  • Critical Essays 27
  • Essay Topics and Review Questions 33
  • Selected Bibliography 34
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 35

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.