Politics from Inside: An Epistolary Chronicle, 1906-1914

By Sir Austen Chamberlain | Go to book overview

1910: MAY, JUNE
Death of King Edward VII

9 EGERTON PLACE, S.W.,
11th May 1910.

The House met today, but the Speaker is not yet home, so I was unable to get an answer to Father’s question. I must either call upon him after his return or else write to him and in any case I will let you know the result.

I wired to you as soon as Asquith announced his intentions. The House is to adjourn till 8th June. Ivy and I have settled to go motoring in France with Leverton from 22nd May to 11th June or 12th unless anything unexpected happens to alter our plans. We shall probably go to Boulogne, work down to the Loire and return by Brittany and Normandy. At any rate our operations will be within these limits.

The speaking in the House today was good. Asquith, Balfour and Enoch Edwards (Hanley, Labour) were all good. They spoke with evident feeling and sincerity. I thought Balfour’s references to the growing importance of the Crown as the link of Empire well and usefully said. He too put the King’s real part in Foreign Policy well and impressively. Asquith spoke with much feeling—almost too much; his tears come too easily—and the whole showed the House of Commons at its high level.

The address in reply was ordered to be presented to His Majesty by the M.P.s who are Privy Councillors. None of us could remember that this was formally carried out last time; but after some hesitation we were told that there ought to be five or six Privy Councillors from each side, and four of us who were talking with Balfour at the time accompanied him to Marlborough House. Asquith handed the King the address voted by the House; the King took it and then shook hands with each of us. He said a

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Politics from Inside: An Epistolary Chronicle, 1906-1914
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgment 6
  • Contents 7
  • Foreword 9
  • The Family Circle 13
  • The Family Circle 15
  • Prelude 22
  • 1906 35
  • Introductory to 1906 Letters 37
  • 1907 45
  • Introductory to 1907 Letters 47
  • 1907- February, March 48
  • 1907- April, May 65
  • 1908 91
  • Introductory to 1908 Letters 93
  • 1908- January–April 94
  • 1908- May 105
  • 1908- May, June, July 115
  • 1909 133
  • Introductory to 1909 Letters 135
  • 1909- February 138
  • 1909- March, April 155
  • 1909- April–May 176
  • 1910 187
  • Introductory to 1910 Letters 189
  • 1910- January–March 196
  • 1910- March 217
  • 1910- April, May 240
  • 1910- May, June 267
  • 1910- October 279
  • 1910- November, December 298
  • 1911 313
  • Introductory to 1911 Letters 315
  • 1911- February, March 324
  • 1911- May 335
  • 1911- June–August 341
  • 1911- September, October 353
  • 1911- October, November 358
  • 1912 401
  • Introductory to 1912 Letters 403
  • 1912- January, February 408
  • 1912- February–April 429
  • 1912- April, May 471
  • 1912- June–December 490
  • 1913 499
  • Introductory to 1913 Letters 501
  • 1913- January–March 508
  • 1913- April–August 542
  • 1913- October–December 567
  • 1914 597
  • Introductory to 1914 Letters 599
  • 1914- March–May 624
  • Index 649
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