Chronology
1915Born October 17 in New York City, second son of Isadore and Augusta Miller.
1929Depression causes financial difficulties in father’s clothing business. Family moves to Brooklyn.
1934Enters the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Studies journalism.
1936First play, Honors at Dawn, produced. Wins Hopwood Awards in Drama for No Villain (1936) and Honors at Dawn (1937), and Theatre Guild Bureau of New Plays Award for They Too Arise.
1938Receives Bachelor of Arts from University of Michigan. Begins work with the Federal Theatre Project.
1940Marries Mary Grace Slattery.
1944Visits army camps collecting material for screenplay, The Story of G.I. Joe. Situation Normal (prose account of this tour) published. The Man Who Had All the Luck published and produced in New York; wins Theatre Guild National Prize.
1945Novel, Focus, published.
1947All My Sons produced and published in New York; wins New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award.
1949Death of a Salesman published and produced; wins Pulitzer Prize and New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award.
1950Adaptation of Ibsen’s An Enemy of the People produced.
1953The Crucible produced and published.
1954Is refused passport by State Department to attend opening of The Crucible in Brussels.
1955A Memory of Two Mondays and the one-act version of A View from the Bridge produced and published in New York.
1956Two-act version of A View from the Bridge produced in London. Divorces Mary Slattery. Appears before House Un-American Activities Committee. Marries Marilyn Monroe.

-135-

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Arthur Miller's All My Sons
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Modern Critical Interpretations iv
  • Contents v
  • Introduction 1
  • The Question of Relatedness 5
  • Thesis and Drama 15
  • Joe Keller and His Sons 19
  • The Living and the Dead in All My Sons 27
  • Miller, Ibsen, and Organic Drama 33
  • The Failure of Social Vision 47
  • All My Sons and the Larger Context 63
  • "The Action and Its Significance- Miller’s Struggle with Dramatic Form 77
  • Two Early Plays 91
  • All My Sons 101
  • Realism and Idealism 107
  • The Dramatic Strategy of All My Sons 113
  • Bad Faith and All My Sons 123
  • Chronology 135
  • Contributors 137
  • Bibliography 139
  • Acknowledgments 141
  • Index 143
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