Index
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Twain), 2
After the Fall, 35, 63, 110, 111; Cain and Abel archetype in, 89, 95; compromises in, 33; dramatization of past and present in, 41; failure of, 87, 88; as good theater, 86–87; guilt in, 131; narrator in, 83; themes of, 87. See also specific characters
Albee, Edward, The Zoo Story, 1
Alfieri (A View from the Bridge), 82, 83, 86
All My Sons: absent figures in, 132–33; actions and consequences as theme in, 12, 79; artlessness and untheatricality of, 9, 39, 47, 53; audience perspective in, 114, 116; bad faith in, 123–33; Cain and Abel archetype in, 88, 95; central question in, 116; climax of, 50, 51, 59; compared to Antigone, 19; compared to Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, 70; compared to Death of a Salesman, 69, 70, 129; compared to An Enemy of the People, 33; compared to The Man Who Had All the Luck, 93–99; compared to The Wild Duck, 108–9, 111; contrivance in, 51–52, 53, 58, 59, 61, 103, 105, 113; crisis of, 50, 59; critique of society in, 111–12; dialogue in, 54–58, 86, 101–3; didacticism in, 26, 57, 99; dramatization of past and present in, 12, 113, 125–26; earlier versions of, 12–13; emotional vs. intellectual centers in, 59, 60, 79–80, 85–86, 89; evasion as theme in, 41–42; factual source of, 9–10, 35; failures of, 4, 22, 69, 71–73, 75; family loyalty in, 20–21, 61; father-son conflict in, 116, 130–32; fidelity and belief in, 117, 118; generation gap in, 63–64; guilt in, 3–4, 16, 60, 108–9, 110; idealism in, 108, 110; individual vs. society as theme in, 11, 16–17, 19–20, 21, 22–23, 24, 25–26, 31, 72, 121; influence of Ibsen on, 11–14; intentions of Miller in, 8, 9–10, 12, 18, 22, 47, 69, 72; lack of conflict resolution in, 22, 25, 104–6; literary status of, 1; The Man Who Had All the Luck as preparation for, 7; as meant for people of common sense, 9, 12, 47; Miller on, 36, 48, 50, 51, 61, 63–64, 68–69, 70, 71–72, 79, 80, 101, 113, 123; minor characters in, 37, 58,

-143-

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Arthur Miller's All My Sons
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Modern Critical Interpretations iv
  • Contents v
  • Introduction 1
  • The Question of Relatedness 5
  • Thesis and Drama 15
  • Joe Keller and His Sons 19
  • The Living and the Dead in All My Sons 27
  • Miller, Ibsen, and Organic Drama 33
  • The Failure of Social Vision 47
  • All My Sons and the Larger Context 63
  • "The Action and Its Significance- Miller’s Struggle with Dramatic Form 77
  • Two Early Plays 91
  • All My Sons 101
  • Realism and Idealism 107
  • The Dramatic Strategy of All My Sons 113
  • Bad Faith and All My Sons 123
  • Chronology 135
  • Contributors 137
  • Bibliography 139
  • Acknowledgments 141
  • Index 143
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