Empire Made Me: An Englishman Adrift in Shanghai

By Robert Bickers | Go to book overview

11
Aftermath

Noji had the gall to attend the funeral. He stood ten feet behind Holy Trinity’s Dean Trivett, sporting a large black armband, and bowed ‘reverently’ as the hearse passed. Twenty of Tinkler’s colleagues from the United Services Association led the procession, medals glinting in the bright June sun as they marched by the hearse through the Hongqiao (Hungjao) cemetery, west of the Settlement. From among them came the pall-bearers, who carried the coffin, draped with the Union flag, to what Hargreaves later decided should be a ‘company grave’, the upkeep of which would be met by the CPA. There was a large turnout from a shocked and wounded British community. Many had had their own minor altercations with Japanese sentries at the Garden Bridge, or elsewhere. Another man, Bertram Lillie, had recently died in a car accident along with a Japanese soldier during one such incident; ‘there, but…’, they will have thought. Even the British Ambassador was guarded by an armed escort from the SMP. In Hongqiao, the wild belligerence of Tinkler’s mad June morning fell away. ‘At present Might is Right’, ran the inscription attached to one set of flowers. Wreaths came from colleagues at China Printing, from ‘Number One Boy’, from ‘Number One Cook’. There were many, too, from the SMP: ‘Old Comrades at Sinza’, ‘Former Colleagues at Bubbling Well’, ‘Comrades of Ward Road Gaol Staff, ‘Officers of the SMP’, ‘The Bodega’, a bar run by an expoliceman. Whatever else might have been said - and it was as likely to have been said in Shanghai as it was in the Foreign Office - Maurice Tinkler was one of them still: a Briton in Shanghai, and a former member of the SMP. They too were in the firing line, every day. From the funeral parlour to the cemetery the hearse had been escorted by an SMP motorbike and car. His death was announced in Police Orders.1

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Empire Made Me: An Englishman Adrift in Shanghai
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • I - The Empire World 1
  • 2 - Before Shanghai 18
  • 3 - Shanghai 1919 39
  • 4 - The Shanghai Municipal Police 64
  • 5 - Shanghai Detective 95
  • 6 - ‘Learning to Be a Man’ 130
  • 7 - The End of the ‘Good Old China’ 163
  • 8 - What We Can’t Know 202
  • 9 - Adrift in the Empire World 223
  • 10 - Empire’s Civil Dead 252
  • 11 - Aftermath 290
  • 12 - We Are the Dead 328
  • Acknowledgements 343
  • Ranks in the Shanghai Municipal Police, Foreign Branch 346
  • Note on Currency 347
  • Romanization of Chinese Words and Names 348
  • Illustrations 349
  • Notes 352
  • Unpublished and Archival Sources 390
  • Index 395
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