The History of the Ninth Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, June, 1861-June, 1864

By Daniel George Macnamara | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI.
BATTLE OF HANOVER COURT HOUSE.

ORDERS TO MARCH—MEETING THE ENEMY—CLEARING THE WAY FOR
GENERAL MCDOWELL—THE BATTLE — THE NINTH MASSACHUSETTS
IN ACTION —GENERAL MoCLELLAN ARRIVES — “THE FIGHTING
NINTH “—OUR LOSSES —COLONEL CASS’ REPORT OF THE NINTH IN
ACTION—LIST OF CASUALTIES—BURYING THE SLAIN—COMPANY E
CAPTURES A FLAG—GENERAL MCDOWELL’S ARMY HELD BACK—
SUCCESS OF GENERAL JACKSON’S “SCARE” IN THE VALLEY—BATTLE
OF PAIR OAKS—CASUALTIES—BAD CONDITION OF THE CHICKA-
HOMINY RIVER—TWO MEN OF THE NINTH SWIM THE RIVER—
GENERAL PRIM OF SPAIN—GENERAL STUART’S CAVALRY RAID—
THE POSITION OF THE UNION ARMY—GENERAL LEE’S AND JACKSON’S
PLANS.

BEFORE THE BATTLE.

“Many a heart that now beats high,
In slumber cold at night shall lie ;
Nor waken even at victory’s sound.
But oh ! how bless’d that hero’s sleep,
O’er whom a wondering world shall weep !”

THOMAS MOORE.

ON the first day of our encampment at Gaines’ Mill, orders were received to hold the regiment in readiness to move forward, at a moment’s notice, in heavy marching order on the following day; that is the 27th day of May, 1862. Company inspections were held and every man was supplied with buck and ball ammunition to the number of eighty rounds each. Two days’ extra rations were likewise issued., The colonel cautioned and ordered the company commanders to see that every available man was present for duty, as it was his purpose to have the full effective force of the regiment in line of march in the morning. A long march was in view, and a battle was in prospect. The colonel’s instructions were carried out to the letter,

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