The History of the Ninth Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, June, 1861-June, 1864

By Daniel George Macnamara | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII.
THE SEVEN DAYS’ BATTLES CONTINUED.

TRIBUTES OF PRAISE TO THE NINTH MASSACHUSETTS—THE “GREEN FLAG”
OF THE NINTH—GENERAL JACKSON AND THE FIFTH CORPS—GEN-
ERAL MAGRDDER’S TACTICS—HEROIC EFFORTS OF THE FIFTH CORPS
—THE NINTH MASSACHUSETTS ON TRENT FARM—ON THE MOVE—
THE MARCH TO MALVERN HILL—BATTLE AT GOLDING’S FARM—
BATTLE AT ALLEN’S FARM, OR PEACH ORCHARD — BATTLE AT SAV-
AGE’S STATION—GENERAL JACKSON’S ARRIVAL AND ARTILLERY ATTACK
— WHITE OAK STREAM AND SWAMP — BATTLE AT GLENDALE— THE
AFFAIR AT TURKEY BRIDGE.

“Prepare you, generals :
The enemy comes on in gallant show ;
Their bloody sign of battle is hung out ;
And something to be done Immediately”

JULIUS CAESAR, Act V., Scene I.

GEN. FITZ JOHN POETER, the corps commander, under whose immediate command the battle of Gaines’ Mill was fought throughout the day; Gen. George W. Morell, the 1st division commander; Gen. Charles Griffin, the commander of the 2d brigade, to which the Ninth Massachusetts Volunteers belonged, and other general officers on the field, who were cognizant of the courage displayed by the Ninth regiment in its masterly retreat at the close of the battle on the 27th of June, expressed themselves in strong terms of praise, at that time, on the valor and bravery of the regiment in repelling the attacks of the foe, and thereby holding the advance of the enemy in check. The writer feels it a duty that is due to the Ninth regiment to quote from the “History of the Irish Brigade,” written by Capt. D. P. Conyngham, A.D.C., in reference to this particular affair. (Page 186.)

“During the charge of the brigade an incident occurred too thrilling to be omitted. The first regiment thrown into the fight to stem Jackson’s force of over twenty thousand men was the Ninth Massachu-

-132-

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