The History of the Ninth Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, June, 1861-June, 1864

By Daniel George Macnamara | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XVIII.
MINE RUN.

OUR ARMY CROSSES INTO VIRGINIA—AFFAIR AT WAPPING HEIGHTS—IN
CAMP AT BEVERLY FORD—EXECUTION OF DESERTERS—OUR NEW
CHAPLAIN—A FORWARD MOVEMENT—NEAR CULPEPPER—MUSKETS
CHANGED FOR RIFLES —GENERAL LEE’S ARMY REDUCED—GENERAL
MEADE’S ARMY REDUCED—GENERAL LEE ATTEMPTS A FLANK MOVE-
MENT —THE MOVEMENT BAFFLED —THE CONFEDERATE ARMY FALLS
BACK—BATTLE OF RAPPAHANNOCK STATION—AT KELLY’S FORD—
GUARDING THE RAILROAD—AGAIN ON THE MOVE—RAIN AND MUD
—COLD WEATHER—WAGONS CAPTURED—AT MINE RUN—PREPAR-
ING FOR AN A.SSAULT—ZERO WEATHER—MINE RUN ABANDONED—
OUR ARMY RECROSSES BOTH RIVERS—AT BEALTON STATION.

* * * * * *

“Friend of the brave ! in peril’s darkest hour,
Intrepid Virtue looks to thee for power;
To thee the heart its trembling homage yields,
On stormy floods and carnage cover’d fields,
“When front to front the banner’d hosts combine,
Halt ere they close, and form the dreadful line.
When all is still on Death’s devoted soil,
The march-worn soldier mingles for the toil !
As rings his glittering tube, he lifts on high
The dauntless brow and spirit-speaking eye,
Hails in his heart the triumph yet to come,
And hears thy stormy music in the drum ! “
* * * * * *

THOMAS CAMPBELL. — “Pleasures of Hope.”

THERE was no time lost by General Meade in pursuing the Confederate army into Virginia. July 15, 1863, we started on the march at 4.30 A.M. and passed through the town of Keedysville, Md., on the road to South Mountain over which we had a laborious tramp, and at 4 o’clock P.M. went into bivouac within a few miles of the town of Burkittsville. The weather was hot and the roads bad. Many of the men throughout our marching columns, during this toilsome twenty miles, were obliged to fall out from heat, exhaustion and sunstroke. On the 16th we marched through Burkittsville and Peters-

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