The History of the Ninth Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, June, 1861-June, 1864

By Daniel George Macnamara | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XX.
BATTLE OF THE WILDERNESS.

BATTLE OF THE WILDERNESS—DESPERATE FIGHTING—HEAVY LOSSES—
LIST OF CASUALTIES IN THE NINTH MASSACHUSETTS—MOVEMENT
SOUTH BY THE LEFT FLANK—BATTLE OF LAUREL HILL—OUR
INFANTRY AND CAVALRY MOVEMENTS—GENERAL SHERIDAN SUCCEEDS
IN DEFEATING GENERAL STUART—MOVEMENT ON SPOTTSYLVANIA—
ASSAULT AT PO RIVER — BATTLE OF SPOTTSYLVANIA—LOSSES—
MOVEMENT BY THE LEFT FLANK MAY 13—UNSUCCESSFUL ASSAULT
—CONFEDERATE RAID ON WAGON TRAINS MET AND DEFEATED—
LIST OP CASUALTIES IN THE NINTH MASSACHUSETTS—BIOGRAPHICAL
SKETCH OF GENERAL GUINEY.

See the smoke how the lightning is cleaving asunder !
Hark ! the guns, peal on peal, how they boom in their thunder !
From host to host, with kindling sound,
The shouted signal circles round;
Ay, shout it forth to life or death,—
Freer already breathes the breath !
The war is waging, slaughter raging,
And heavy through the reeking pall
The iron death-dice fall !
Nearer they close,— foes upon foes,—
“Ready !” — from square “to square it goes.

SCHILLER.— “The Battle.”

THE first battle of General Grant’s campaign in Virginia was fought on the following day, May 5, 1864, and is known in history as the battle of the Wilderness. It was the commencement of heavy and continued fighting such as the Army of the Potomac had not engaged in since the days of the desperate seven days’ battles, in front of Richmond, under General McClellan in June and July, 1862. It was a singular coincidence that General Grant’s last battle before Richmond occurred in the same month of the year, at Cold Harbor, a village not far from the Chickahominy river, near Gaines’ Mill, where the second day’s terrible engagement of the seven days’ battles

-370-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The History of the Ninth Regiment, Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, June, 1861-June, 1864
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 561

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.