Professional Development for Educational Management

By Lesley Kydd; Megan Crawford et al. | Go to book overview

4
The process of educational
management learning*

KATE BULLOCK, CHRIS JAMES AND IAN JAMIESON


Introduction

With devolved autonomy, increased accountability and market forces thrust upon schools in recent years, the field of educational management has become ever more complex. This increase in complexity has been mirrored by a growing realisation of the importance of sound and effective educational management practices in the delivery of the whole curriculum for all pupils (Glatter 1989; Weindling 1990; HMCI 1992). A number of studies (for example, Hoyle and McMahon 1986; Saran and Trafford 1990; Eraut 1993; Southworth 1993) have detailed the skills and qualities that senior teachers require to perform effectively as educational managers, but there have been few published reports of systematic studies of the work of school managers, such as Earley and Fletcher-Campbell (1989), and yet fewer studies that have explored the nature of learning that supports educational management development.

This chapter reports some of the outcomes of an exploratory study of educational managers at different stages in their careers. The study investigated the developmental nature of managerial knowledge and the ways in which that knowledge is acquired. The intention was to reveal the implications for the teaching of educational management which were grounded in the experiences of educational managers, and indicate areas where deeper investigation is warranted.


Research methodology and techniques

The research design concentrated on the use of in-depth interviews to compare the conceptions and experiences of teachers who had just acquired a school management

*This chapter has been edited and abridged. It originally appeared as ‘An exploratory study of novices and experts in educational management’ in Educational Management and Administration, published in 1995.

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