Isaiah 1-12: A Continental Commentary

By Hans Wildberger; Thomas H. Trapp | Go to book overview

Decadent Cult

Literature

[Literature update through 1979: M. Tsevat, “Isaiah I 31,” FT 19 (1969) 261–263. S. E. Loewenstamm, “Isaiah I 31,” FT22 (1972) 246–248.]


Text

1:29 Truly, ‘you’a will bring shame upon ‘yourselves’ because of
the trees,b
your desires for them remain,
and will turn red in humiliation on account of the gardens,
which you have chosen for yourselves.

30 Yes, you will become like a terebinth,
which has leavesa which are shriveling,
and as a garden, which
has no water.b

31 At that time the strong onea will become a broken fiber,
and what he has madeb will become tiny bits,
and both will burn at the same time,
and there is no one who can put it out.

29a The use of the third person in

(they will be ashamed) is impossible next to the use of the second person in vv. 29bf. Gk and Syr read the third person throughout, which may have been influenced by v. 28. It should be read as (you will bring shame upon yourselves), based on some MSS and the Targ.

29b Qa reads

here instead of (terebinth) (see also Isa. 57:5). Is this only an orthographic variation, or is the plural of , “God,” intended here? Gk reads (concerning the idols) and seems to presume the reading (terebinth), as is pointed out by P. Wernberg-McMer (“Studies in the Defective Spellings in the Isaiah-Scroll of St. Mark’s Monastery,” JSS 3 [1958] 244–264; see 254); H. M. Orlinsky (“The Textual Criticism of the Old Testament,” FS W. F. Albright [1961] 122) in fact considers to be a translation of , terebinths = idol. According to KBL, is the plural of (a never attested) singular , “large, strong tree” and, in that sense, it is identical to (root , “be in front, be strong”). If this is the case, the spelling is correct in the MT. Whether , “God,” is also connected to the same root as this continues to be a contro-

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Isaiah 1-12: A Continental Commentary
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Other Continental Commentaries from Fortress Press ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Translator’s Preface ix
  • The Superscription 1
  • Sons of Yahweh without Understanding 8
  • Almost like Sodom 18
  • True and False Worship of God 33
  • Good Things or the Sword 53
  • Jerusalem in a Purifying Judgment 59
  • Decadent Cult 74
  • The Pilgrimage of the Peoples to Zion 81
  • A Day of Yahweh 97
  • A Threat of Anarchy 123
  • Lament for the People of God 137
  • Yah Wen’s Accusation 140
  • Against the Pride of the Daughters of Zion 145
  • Women in Need in the City Devastated by War 157
  • The Holy Remnant on Devastated Zion 162
  • The Song of the Vineyard 175
  • Woes on the Callous and Irresponsible 188
  • Yahweh’s Outstretched Hand 218
  • Theophany and Commissioning 246
  • Not Cowardice, but Faith! 279
  • Disaster and Salvation "On That Day" 319
  • Speedy Plunder—swift Pillage 330
  • Shiloah Waters and Euphrates Flood 340
  • The Plan of the Peoples 349
  • Yahweh, the True Conspirator 354
  • The Sealing of the Admonition 363
  • Oppressive Darkness 376
  • The Great Light 383
  • Assyria’s Arrogance 411
  • The Great Fire of God 427
  • The Return of the Remnant 434
  • No Fear of Assyria 439
  • The March against Jerusalem 446
  • Messiah and Kingdom of Peace 459
  • Homecoming and Salvation 486
  • The Song of Praise of the Redeemed 499
  • Manuscript Sigla 509
  • Hebrew Grammars Cited 510
  • Abbreviations 511
  • Index of Hebrew Words 516
  • Index of Biblical and Related References 518
  • Index of Names and Subjects 521
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